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  read please -
Posted by: jameson245 - 09-09-2018, 09:27 PM - Forum: good primer, perhaps - Replies (8)

Murder of JonBenet Ramsey Taken From TruTV – Crime Library By Marilyn Bardsley and Patrick Bellamy with edits by jameson (CORRECTIONS IN CAPS)

Exposure - The JonBenet Ramsey Story 

The first images of JonBenet Ramsey that were broadcast to the world showed a pretty little girl in heavy make-up and flamboyant costumes parading across a stage. At the time, the media described her as "a painted baby, a sexualized toddler beauty queen." From the day in 1996 when JonBenet was found dead in the basement of her home in Boulder, Colorado, the Boulder police and a large proportion of the world's media believed that her parents, John and Patsy Ramsey, were responsible for her death. 

Prior to the murder of their daughter, John and Patsy Ramsey's life seemed almost ideal. Patsy, a former beauty queen, was married to a successful businessman. They had moved to Boulder where John ran a computer company that he had started in his garage, in 1991. The Ramseys readily adapted to their new life in Colorado and made many new friends. They REMODELED a large house in an elite suburb, and entertained often. Their last party in Boulder, just three days before the murder, was particularly happy.

EARLIER, AT A SEPARATE PARTY - Over a hundred guests were present at a Christmas function. The Ramseys believed that they had good reason to celebrate. Patsy had warded off a recurrence of ovarian cancer and John had been voted Boulder's "businessman of the year." 

According to the Ramseys' testimony, they drove home the few blocks from a party at a friend's house on Christmas night. JonBenet had fallen asleep in the car so they carried her up the stairs to her room and put her to bed at 9:30 p.m. Shortly after, Patsy and John went to bed, as they planned to get up early to prepare for a trip to their holiday home on Lake Michigan.
 
The next day, Patsy woke just after 5:00 a.m. and walked down the stairs to the kitchen. On the staircase, she found a two-and-a-half page note that said that JonBenet had been kidnapped by a "small foreign faction" and was being held for a ransom of $118,000. She was to be exchanged for the money the next day. The letter warned that if the money was not delivered, the child would be executed. Patsy yelled to John as she ran back up the stairs and opened the door to JonBenet's room. Finding she wasn't there, they made the decision to phone the police. The 911 dispatcher recorded Patsy's call at 5:25 a.m. The police arrived at the house seven minutes later. 

The uniformed police officers that attended were openly suspicious from The Start. The Ramseys, treating the ransom demand seriously, were already taking steps to raise the ransom money. The note said that the kidnappers would call John Ramsey but no call came.
 
2  
 
Suspicion Mounts
It was while the police were waiting for the call that they made several critical mistakes. They did not conduct a proper search of the house, the area was not sealed off and friends were allowed to walk in and out at their leisure. No moves were made to protect any forensic evidence. The scale of their mistakes became apparent later that afternoon when a detective asked Fleet White, a friend of the Ramseys, to take John and search the house for "anything unusual." They started in the basement. Later, during the documentary Who Killed JonBenet?, made by Channel Four in London, John Ramsey describes what they found: "As I was walking through the basement, I opened the door to a room and knew immediately that I'd found her because there was a white blanket — her eyes were closed, I feared the worse but yet — I'd found her." 

While the Ramseys went to stay with friends, their home became a major crime scene. As this was the only murder in Boulder that year, the investigating police had little experience in that type of crime, with very few of them having conducted a murder investigation at all. Regardless, they immediately assumed the Ramseys were guilty. The fact that JonBenet had been found in her own home by her father was considered highly suspicious. By the time her body had been taken from the house that evening, some of their suspicions had been passed to a local journalist. 

On December 27, The Rocky Mountain News quoted an Assistant District Attorney as saying, "It was very unusual for a kidnap victim's body to be found at home — it's not adding up." According to Charlie Brennan, the journalist who wrote the story, the police had also indicated to him that they held a strong belief that the parents were responsible. Julie Hayden, a television reporter for Denver's Channel 7, also covered the story on the same day and drew the same conclusion. She later explained that from her first exposure to the case, the police had made it very clear that they were not scouring the area looking for "some mad kidnapper," but instead, concentrating their efforts on John and Patsy Ramsey. 

From that day on, a clear pattern emerged in the coverage of the case. While police chief Tom Koby made little comment, reporters had their own sources, which tended to implicate the Ramseys. At that point, John and Patsy were placed under police protection but were largely unaware of the mounting suspicion against them. One man, however, saw the early warning signs and acted. Mike Bynum, a lawyer friend of John's, hired Brian Morgan to act as their personal counsel. In the same documentary, Bynum defended his appointment, stating:
"It is foolish to blindly throw oneself into the maw of the justice system and to trust the result. One simply must be thoughtful about the way one acts, especially in a case of media attention that reaches the point of near hysteria and especially in a case of media attention which, from the outset, portrays certain people as clearly guilty."
 
He also defended the need for legal representation:
"If you're guilty, you want to think about having a lawyer, and I want to tell you what, if you're innocent you better have a lawyer — there is no difference." 

3  
 
The Media Evidence
By December 28, various local news sources made it clear to their readers that the Ramseys were the principal suspects in the case. While the police made few comments regarding any evidence they had to implicate the parents, the media began to cite their own "evidence." The first "clue" they focused on was the supposed lack of footprints in the snow surrounding the house, which suggested that someone inside was responsible. Later the media admitted that this opinion was based on an official report from a policeman at the scene who noted: — "Strange, no footprints." The next item was also gleaned from a police report. It stated that there were allegedly no signs of forced entry. 

The mayor of Boulder, Leslie Durgan, added further weight to the story when she appeared on television stating: — "By all reports there was no visible signs of forced entry. The body was found in a place where people are saying, someone had to know the house."
 
The facts surrounding the so-called "evidence" tell a completely different story.
The first point to come under scrutiny is the snow cover. News video footage shot on December 26 clearly shows that large areas surrounding the house had no snow cover at all. In support of this, Julie Hayden, the television reporter states:
"We looked at the videotape once the footprints in the snow started becoming an issue and one of the things that I observed was, there did not seem to be snow going up to all of the doors. So, in my opinion, this thing about footprints in the snow has always been much ado about nothing because it seemed clear to me that people could have gotten in the house, whether they did or not, without traipsing through the snow." 

Even with blatant visual evidence that proved that the theory was groundless, the story continued to be told. 

Even more doubtful was the claim of "no forced entry." The police report on December 26 noted that there were a number of open windows and at least one open door; therefore, an intruder would not need to break in. One possible point of entry was the basement window. Not only was it easily accessible via a ground level lift-out grille, it had been broken sometime before Christmas and could not be secured. These facts, although well documented by the police, did not come to public attention until a year after the event.
 
When questioned regarding the accuracy of the information he received, reporter Charlie Brennan stated that up until March 1997, he and other members of the press did not know that there was a broken window in the basement and believed that his police source had fed him false information. 

The reality of this situation is that an intruder could have easily entered the house through the basement window and moved around the house virtually undetected and unheard.

 JonBenet's bedroom is one floor below her parents' room, a total distance of 55 feet of walkways, covered by thick carpeting, making it ideal for a soundless approach. 

Furthermore, there is no hidden room. A carpeted spiral staircase, a few feet from her room, leads down to the kitchen. From the kitchen, it is only a few steps to the door that leads to the basement stairs. At the bottom of the stairs is a short corridor that leads directly to the room where her body was found.
 
The end result? — No secret room, no need for forced entry and very little snow, which leads to one of two conclusions — either the press distorted the facts to embellish their story or someone inside the police department leaked false information, intentionally or otherwise. Despite having been proved incorrect, all three bits of misinformation were given continual coverage.

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  PDI
Posted by: jameson245 - 09-09-2018, 09:11 PM - Forum: Handwriting - No Replies

Local professor profiles JonBenet's ransom note

  • Feb 18, 2003


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Rachelle Treiber
He was not allowed to take photographs while touring the palatial Boulder, Colo. home where a 6-year-old girl had been killed just months earlier.
But Thomas McAninch did what any good criminologist would: he carefully committed as many details as possible to his memory.


The unique layout of the family's home, the odd placement of light switches and the maze that made up the basement where the child's body had been discovered the day after Christmas in 1996.
Although he is not directly involved in the case, as a professor of criminal justice at Scott Community College, McAninch took a special interest in the 1996 homicide of JonBenet Ramsey, and in an investigation that has resulted in no arrest and little closure.
He believes that is due in part to a botched investigation by Boulder Police.
"I have been there and been through the house, I have spoken with people who investigated the murder — but I am not connected to the case," said McAninch, a 53-year-old Bettendorf researcher and educator. "I teach profiling, but I do not consider myself an expert."
McAninch, a member of the Quad-City Council of Police Chiefs, has written numerous publications and lectured at national conferences on various criminology subjects including profiling.
Along with his wife, Helen, a local lawyer, he has developed supplemental materials for criminology textbooks for Wadsworth and McGraw-Hill publishers.
In addition, he has toured Chinese prisons at the invitation of that country's government, serves as an associate editor of the Journal of Gang Research, and was recently honored with the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award — named for a University of Chicago sociologist who studied gangs in the 1920s.
This semester, in one of his courses at Scott Community College, he explores profiling methods used in several murder cases including the unsolved killing of JonBenet, the little beauty queen who for years after her death still was being featured on the cover of national tabloids wearing pageant gowns.
"I have been asked this at conferences, by academicians, by the press — but I don't know who killed JonBenet. I do know that someone in that house is connected with her death," he said. "And that this was never a kidnapping, it was a murder whether accidental or purposeful."
Standing before his class during a recent lecture on the subject of profiling, he explained his analysis of the ransom note found in John and Patsy Ramsey's home just hours before their daughter's body was discovered in the basement.
"It is a right-handed person who wrote this block-style with their left hand," McAninch said of the letter.
"I have had many kids sit down and re-write this — it takes an average of 15 to 30 minutes. Someone just killed a 6-year-old then sits down to write a three-page letter in the house where the body is — that is someone who is not afraid of being discovered in the home," he added.
He said the note itself attempts to point the reader to a type of individual, specifically a Middle Eastern terrorist —a person who would act quickly and without empathy for JonBenet or her family.
But McAninch said he was taught something very important from famed FBI profiler and criminologist Robert Ressler.
"One of the things Bob Ressler taught me is if someone is trying really hard to get you to look one way, the first thing you should do is look the other way," McAninch said.
And that is why his interpretation of the ransom note has led him to believe the author is someone exactly the opposite of what the note states. A person who is staging a crime scene.
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He said it was apparent from the beginning of the letter that a crime was being staged to look like something it was not.
"The author says they represent a ‘small foreign faction,' but no self-respecting terrorist would consider themselves less that representative of the masses," he said. "It also says ‘we respect your business,' but would a foreign faction respect your business? You just don't find this kind of thing in kidnapping notes," he said.
Furthermore, he believes a sentence that states, "speaking to anyone about your situation will result in your daughter being beheaded," also is an example of the author trying to speak as they believe a terrorist would.
And terms written in the letter like "fat cat" are idioms that would not be taught to a foreign person learning the language. For those reasons, he said it was easy to eliminate a person from the Middle East as the author of the ransom note.
"A profile does not predict the individual, it predicts the type of person, and more specifically, it eliminates people," he explained.
Regarding the lengthy period the person took to write one version of the letter, he said the note itself is edited, which would have taken even more time. "There is an inserted ‘not,'" which is very important. It reinforces that this person had time and they are comfortable — not a stranger to the house."
Several parts of the letter, he said, also show the author is a person who knows John Ramsey well.

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According to FBI agents, the $118,000 requested in ransom note turned out to be the exact amount of John Ramsey's Christmas bonus.
And the end of the letter, which states "Victory, S.B.T.C.," is something McAninch said stands for Subic Bay Training Center, where John Ramsey was stationed while serving in the military in the Philippines.
"Also, throughout the letter, the writer stops calling John ‘Mr. Ramsey,' and begins to call him by his first name, showing he or she knows the family on a personal level," McAninch said.
There are also several aspects of the note that lead McAninch to believe a well-educated female likely wrote it. "The use of the word "attaché. With the exception of people in government, men usually call it a briefcase. And phrases like ‘and hence,' and ‘law enforcement countermeasures,' are fairly sophisticated," he explained.
He said the letter also refers to southern phrases like "use that good southern common sense of yours."
He said John Ramsey and his wife, Patsy, have given handwriting samples and neither has been charged with any crime related to the case.
However, McAninch stressed that his profile is not necessarily for who killed JonBenet, but rather for who wrote the note. He believes the girl's mother fits the profile of the ransom note's author.
"Patsy ends up fitting the profile really well. That is not a fingerprint, not a DNA match — those are absolutes. This is very subjective and that is why we cannot convict on this type of thing," he said.
In the end, he knows only what type of person could or could not have written the letter.
"So what do I know — I know that the ransom note was not written by a transient, terrorists from the Middle East, or a sexual offender. I believe it was written by someone close to the family or a family member," he said.
"They say this is still an open case, but unless something huge happens, it is closed," he said.
Rachelle Treiber can be contacted at (563) 383-2363 or rtreiber@qctimes.com.

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  PDI
Posted by: jameson245 - 09-09-2018, 08:58 PM - Forum: Handwriting - No Replies

Local professor profiles JonBenet's ransom note

  • Feb 18, 2003


    Rachelle Treiber
    He was not allowed to take photographs while touring the palatial Boulder, Colo. home where a 6-year-old girl had been killed just months earlier.
    But Thomas McAninch did what any good criminologist would: he carefully committed as many details as possible to his memory.


    The unique layout of the family's home, the odd placement of light switches and the maze that made up the basement where the child's body had been discovered the day after Christmas in 1996.
    Although he is not directly involved in the case, as a professor of criminal justice at Scott Community College, McAninch took a special interest in the 1996 homicide of JonBenet Ramsey, and in an investigation that has resulted in no arrest and little closure.
    He believes that is due in part to a botched investigation by Boulder Police.
    "I have been there and been through the house, I have spoken with people who investigated the murder — but I am not connected to the case," said McAninch, a 53-year-old Bettendorf researcher and educator. "I teach profiling, but I do not consider myself an expert."
    McAninch, a member of the Quad-City Council of Police Chiefs, has written numerous publications and lectured at national conferences on various criminology subjects including profiling.
    Along with his wife, Helen, a local lawyer, he has developed supplemental materials for criminology textbooks for Wadsworth and McGraw-Hill publishers.
    In addition, he has toured Chinese prisons at the invitation of that country's government, serves as an associate editor of the Journal of Gang Research, and was recently honored with the Frederic Milton Thrasher Award — named for a University of Chicago sociologist who studied gangs in the 1920s.
    This semester, in one of his courses at Scott Community College, he explores profiling methods used in several murder cases including the unsolved killing of JonBenet, the little beauty queen who for years after her death still was being featured on the cover of national tabloids wearing pageant gowns.
    "I have been asked this at conferences, by academicians, by the press — but I don't know who killed JonBenet. I do know that someone in that house is connected with her death," he said. "And that this was never a kidnapping, it was a murder whether accidental or purposeful."
    Standing before his class during a recent lecture on the subject of profiling, he explained his analysis of the ransom note found in John and Patsy Ramsey's home just hours before their daughter's body was discovered in the basement.
    "It is a right-handed person who wrote this block-style with their left hand," McAninch said of the letter.
    "I have had many kids sit down and re-write this — it takes an average of 15 to 30 minutes. Someone just killed a 6-year-old then sits down to write a three-page letter in the house where the body is — that is someone who is not afraid of being discovered in the home," he added.
    He said the note itself attempts to point the reader to a type of individual, specifically a Middle Eastern terrorist —a person who would act quickly and without empathy for JonBenet or her family.
    But McAninch said he was taught something very important from famed FBI profiler and criminologist Robert Ressler.
    "One of the things Bob Ressler taught me is if someone is trying really hard to get you to look one way, the first thing you should do is look the other way," McAninch said.
    And that is why his interpretation of the ransom note has led him to believe the author is someone exactly the opposite of what the note states. A person who is staging a crime scene.

He said it was apparent from the beginning of the letter that a crime was being staged to look like something it was not.
"The author says they represent a ‘small foreign faction,' but no self-respecting terrorist would consider themselves less that representative of the masses," he said. "It also says ‘we respect your business,' but would a foreign faction respect your business? You just don't find this kind of thing in kidnapping notes," he said.
Furthermore, he believes a sentence that states, "speaking to anyone about your situation will result in your daughter being beheaded," also is an example of the author trying to speak as they believe a terrorist would.
And terms written in the letter like "fat cat" are idioms that would not be taught to a foreign person learning the language. For those reasons, he said it was easy to eliminate a person from the Middle East as the author of the ransom note.
"A profile does not predict the individual, it predicts the type of person, and more specifically, it eliminates people," he explained.
Regarding the lengthy period the person took to write one version of the letter, he said the note itself is edited, which would have taken even more time. "There is an inserted ‘not,'" which is very important. It reinforces that this person had time and they are comfortable — not a stranger to the house."
Several parts of the letter, he said, also show the author is a person who knows John Ramsey well.

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According to FBI agents, the $118,000 requested in ransom note turned out to be the exact amount of John Ramsey's Christmas bonus.
And the end of the letter, which states "Victory, S.B.T.C.," is something McAninch said stands for Subic Bay Training Center, where John Ramsey was stationed while serving in the military in the Philippines.
"Also, throughout the letter, the writer stops calling John ‘Mr. Ramsey,' and begins to call him by his first name, showing he or she knows the family on a personal level," McAninch said.
There are also several aspects of the note that lead McAninch to believe a well-educated female likely wrote it. "The use of the word "attaché. With the exception of people in government, men usually call it a briefcase. And phrases like ‘and hence,' and ‘law enforcement countermeasures,' are fairly sophisticated," he explained.
He said the letter also refers to southern phrases like "use that good southern common sense of yours."
He said John Ramsey and his wife, Patsy, have given handwriting samples and neither has been charged with any crime related to the case.
However, McAninch stressed that his profile is not necessarily for who killed JonBenet, but rather for who wrote the note. He believes the girl's mother fits the profile of the ransom note's author.
"Patsy ends up fitting the profile really well. That is not a fingerprint, not a DNA match — those are absolutes. This is very subjective and that is why we cannot convict on this type of thing," he said.
In the end, he knows only what type of person could or could not have written the letter.
"So what do I know — I know that the ransom note was not written by a transient, terrorists from the Middle East, or a sexual offender. I believe it was written by someone close to the family or a family member," he said.
"They say this is still an open case, but unless something huge happens, it is closed," he said.
Rachelle Treiber can be contacted at (563) 383-2363 or rtreiber@qctimes.com.

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  Diane Diamond on Patsy's death
Posted by: jameson245 - 09-09-2018, 08:54 PM - Forum: Patsy Ramsey - bio - No Replies

Rest In Peace Patsy Ramsey
By Diane Dimond

  • 32

Patsy Ramsey is looking down from the heavens she always prayed to with her trademark beauty pageant smile. Standing next to her is her beautiful daughter, JonBenet Ramsey. They are benevolent but still wagging a finger of “I-told-you-so” at all of us.
The letter of exoneration was stunning in what it revealed - a new form of forensic testing found two distinct spots of male DNA on the clothing JonBenet was wearing when she was killed. And that “touch testing” DNA matches the sample taken from her underwear back in 1997. In other words, the killer left three separate spots of evidence to help track him down. None of the DNA matches any member of the Ramsey family.
The current District Attorney of Boulder, Colorado, Mary Lacy, says she wishes she could have delivered the news before Patsy died in 2006. DA Lacy’s declaration that her office will now “treat you as the victims of this crime, with the sympathy due you ....” may have come as a relief to patriarch John Ramsey but I doubt it.
“We became entertainment for the country,” John Ramsey once said long after he’d lost both his daughter and his wife. His implication was that the media made sure everyone thought they were guilty of murdering their child.
I agree. I was part of the media pact that descended on Boulder right after Christmas 1996. For months I and my colleagues tramped around town trying to find the truth. Tabloid headlines screamed, “Did Daddy Do It?” and “Cops: Mom Confesses!”
There was a frenzy of media to get something - anything - and for months the story was top of the news. My boss at the now defunct TV program HARD COPY sent me on an open ended ticket to Boulder and when I couldn’t develop any new angle she ordered me to follow JonBenet’s brother Burke to and from his elementary school. I refused to shadow a little kid, especially one who just lost his little sister, and I left the program about a month later.

The media was brutal. Extensive handwriting tests concluded Patsy did not pen the ransom note left at the scene but there were leaks from investigators that she might have used her left hand to write it. John Ramsey’s computers were seized and another police leak revealed they had reason to look for child porn. Ed Gelb, a highly regarded polygraph expert conducted five different tests with John and Patsy and concluded they “passed with flying colors - no deception.”
And the most remarkable under-reported news to my mind was the revelation that at the time of Jon Benet’s death there were 38 of her neighbors listed as registered sex offenders and there had been over 100 burglaries in the immediate area. To my knowledge the police did not pursue those leads even though the victim had been paraded around as a mini beauty queen. Further, nine months after the 6 year olds murder there was a very similar intruder/sex attack in the neighborhood. While the family was out a man broke in and hid in the house until they were asleep. He then attacked their 12 year old daughter but got away when the parents responded to her screams.
Yet still so many Americans, the media and the public, continued to point at the parents. Shame on us.
The Ramsey family survived the death of a child, public humiliation while “under an umbrella of suspicion”, repeated handwriting and lie detector tests, false leads and hopes, several recurrences of Patsy’s cancer and the maniacal rantings of a sexually confused kook.

In the spring of 2006 Patsy Ramsey was fighting what would be her last bout with ovarian cancer. And suddenly from out of the woodwork they began to get e-mail messages from half a world away. A slight, fragile looking man named John Mark Karr was taken into custody in the Philippines and paraded in front of the predictable gaggle of media where he confessed.
“I was with Jon Benet when she died,” he said and demurely batted his eyelashes. Asked, then to explain the details Karr simply said, “Her death was an accident.” Brought back to Colorado to face charges the authorities, instead, determined he was one of those inexplicable characters who confess to crimes they did not commit.
By this time Patsy had died and was spared the spectacle.
In 2000 I was assigned to cover a lecture given by the Ramseys in Washington to a group of young journalists. I’d never known Patsy had studied journalism and was passionate about its ethics. Their message to the students that day was simple. Don’t print it or say it unless you can prove it. And in a twist on the Golden Rule Patsy said, “Don’t go forward and do to others what has been done to us.”
Good advice for all of us.

Follow Diane Dimond on Twitter: www.twitter.com/dianedimond

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  stories on SO
Posted by: jameson245 - 09-07-2018, 03:53 PM - Forum: Colorado crimes - No Replies

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Colorado’s system for identifying and warning communities about sexually violent predators – the worst rapists and child molesters – has identified almost none of them.
Since a state law went into effect in 1999, Colorado has labeled only two men not in prison as sexually violent predators, even though more than 1,300 sex offenders met the initial criteria to be labeled predators, according to an analysis by The Denver Post.
“That’s it? Amazing,” said former Colorado Rep. Steve Tool, who sponsored the bill that created the sexually violent predator designation for sex offenders considered most likely to re-offend. “I’m very surprised to hear that. After 5 1/2 years, there should be a higher number.”
The Post has found flaws throughout the system, which originally was designed to warn people about the sexually violent predator living next door, or down the street, or next to a school.
The Colorado Department of Corrections – required by law to evaluate potential predators in prison before they hit the streets – had not done a single evaluation as of this month. But as a direct result of inquiries from The Post, the DOC is quickly beginning to perform those tests.
“We made a mistake. There’s no denying we made a mistake,” DOC spokeswoman Alison Morgan said. “The instrument was developed and never administered. We have many people working on it as aggressively as possible.”
Morgan said that after The Post contacted the DOC, officials researched the statute and discovered that they are legally required to perform the evaluations with all sex offenders who meet the initial criteria based on the crimes for which they were convicted.
She said the parole board could have requested that evaluations be done, but in nearly six years it has never done so.
“Sexually violent predator” – or SVP – is a designation that requires police to inform neighbors that a sex offender lives nearby. A recent case in which a man labeled in Florida as a sexual predator moved to Highlands Ranch drew a lot of publicity from newspapers and television stations – and now the offender is moving.

In examining Colorado’s system, The Post found:

[*]Colorado’s assessment system is highly complicated compared to those of other states. Experts say it fails to identify some of the most egregious offenders, allowing them to live virtually unnoticed near unsuspecting neighbors.

[*]More than 670 convicted sex offenders living in Colorado who were categorized as having a high or moderate risk to re-offend are not on the list of sexually violent predators, according to the state probation office.
It is unclear how many evaluations are being done on the front end, when the offenders are first sentenced to prison. State officials have received records of only about 250 evaluations performed by the probation office before the sentencing of 1,365 sex offenders since 1999.
The criteria used to decide who is a sexually violent predator were specifically written to exclude many dangerous offenders. Kim English, research director for the Colorado Justice Division who spearheaded the writing of Colorado’s sexually violent predator law, said community notification unnecessarily alarms the public and prevents offenders from finding places to live.
The Colorado Parole Board has never requested that an evaluation be done on a potential sexually violent predator.
“It’s not working,” said Greig Veeder, a therapist who helped draft Colorado’s sexually violent predator criteria, adding that the rules are too restrictive and exclude many dangerous predators. “We’re not touching the dangerous population, especially in the community.”
[b]The molester next door[/b]
In a Westminster neighborhood, where a man who admitted to molesting 10 boys since 1988 lives in a house with his parents, many neighbors had no idea that a serial molester lived nearby.
Bret Scott Ibsen, 47, admitted to molesting boys ages 10 to 12 while coaching a youth football team. He would take them to Elitch Gardens, Water World, bowling alleys and malls to gain the boys’ trust. He then would molest them during sleep overs at his home.
Ibsen was sentenced to lifetime probation in 2002 after his second sexual-assault conviction since Colorado’s predator law was passed. He paid fines but was not incarcerated.
Ibsen meets the initial criteria to be labeled a predator. But Ib sen never was evaluated, said Mike Garcia, chief probation officer for Adams County.
“It’s not the way it should have went, for sure,” Garcia said. “The judge didn’t order a pre- sentence report, so the SVP didn’t get triggered.”
Neighbors of Ibsen said they were surprised to learn he lived so close.
“I would definitely like to know about him,” said Rose Downing, who was walking in a nearby park with her 9-year-old son, Phil, on a recent day. “You hear about these things, but I didn’t think it would happen here.”
Audra Bier, who lives a block away from Ibsen and has two young sons, said she felt it was her right to know he was living nearby.
“That knowledge is power,” she said.
Contacted at home, Ibsen refused to answer questions about his past.
[b]The crucial cutoff date[/b]
All sex offenders in Colorado must register with local authorities, but their identities are not made public unless a resident of that city or county requests a list kept with police or the sheriff’s department, a process called passive notification.
Only sex offenders who fail to register, those who have multiple offenses and those who are labeled by the state as predators appear on a publicly available statewide website.
Sexually violent predators, however, require active notification. That means law enforcement agencies are required by state law to notify neighbors of their presence.
When Michael Carroll, a sexual predator from Florida, moved in March to a home in Highlands Ranch, neighbors were notified by Douglas County sheriff’s deputies.
The effect was clear. Neighbors attended community meetings. Deputies patrolled the area. Residents talked to one another about keeping their children safe. The house Carroll moved into is now for sale.
Active community notification – if made retroactive, as other states have done – might help in a situation similar to that of Brent J. Brents, who is accused of raping or assaulting up to 10 women in the Denver area and has confessed to at least 20 more. He is in jail awaiting trial.
The earlier crimes that might have tagged Brents as an SVP pre- date Colorado’s registry law. He was convicted in 1988 of sexually assaulting two children.
Freed after serving 15 years of a 20-year sentence, Brents moved to Aurora, where he is alleged to have fondled the son of his neighbor and girlfriend. Because Brents committed his earlier crimes in the late 1980s, before Colorado’s predator law was passed, the girlfriend and other neighbors were never notified about his record by authorities.
A similar Wyoming law, passed two years after Colorado’s, requires notification for crimes dating to 1985, Cheyenne District Attorney Jon Forwood said. Forwood said Wyoming lawmakers didn’t deem community notification a punishment, as did officials in Colorado.
The neighbor who became Brents’ girlfriend said she didn’t know about Brents’ prior convictions for sexually assaulting children at the time. She said she broke off her relationship with Brents once she learned of his past. By then, it was too late.
[b]Predators by the numbers[/b]
Since 1999, 1,300 convicts have met Colorado’s initial criteria for consideration as sexually violent predators based on their crimes. About half are still in prison.
There are just five men labeled as sexually violent predators living in Colorado communities. The one in Highlands Ranch committed his crimes in Florida. Two others are from Maine. Only two committed their crimes in Colorado.
In addition, 28 men incarcerated in Colorado prisons have been labeled as sexually violent predators. Some of them are serving life sentences and may never get out of prison.
By comparison, other states designate far more people for active notification, or as predators, since they and Colorado began drafting laws after 1997 to comply with federal law.
Florida, with about four times Colorado’s population, has labeled 5,177 felons as sexual predators. Florida’s law labels anyone who has committed or attempted rape, sexually assaulted a child, engaged in child pornography or committed lewd acts with a child or a disabled or elderly person.
In Colorado, offenders must have been convicted of one of five crimes to even be eligible for SVP designation. The crimes are first- or second-degree sexual assault; unlawful sexual contact; sexual assault on a child; or sexual assault on a child by a person in a position of trust.
Those convicted must then undergo an extensive psychological evaluation process that excludes many repeat and violent offenders.
In practice, the difference is clear. If the Florida sexual predator now living in Highlands Ranch had committed his offense in Colorado, he would not be considered a predator because, unlike other states’ laws, Colorado’s law was not made retroactive.
Other states are more restrictive than Colorado. In neighboring Wyoming, there are 289 convicted sex offenders about whom police are required to notify neighbors within a 750-foot radius. Wyoming has just 500,000 people, or one-ninth of Colorado’s population.
Arizona has 4,800 offenders for whom active community notification is required. Nebraska has 858.
There are several reasons why Colorado has not labeled more sex offenders as sexual predators.
Many sex offenders simply were convicted before the law’s 1999 start date in Colorado.
Judges or parole boards also must determine that an offender who meets all the lengthy criteria is a sexually violent predator.
Of the 28 people in prison and the two outside labeled as predators, judges designated them all. The parole board has not designated anyone.
“(DOC) has to do the investigation. If (the evaluations are) not presented to us, we don’t know,” said parole board chairman Allan Stanley. “I am concerned that (DOC) hasn’t presented any of these yet.”
Parents for Megan’s Law, a nonprofit that supports the federal statute named for a 7-year- old New Jersey girl raped and murdered in 1994 by a repeat sex offender, recently issued a national report card on offender programs. Colorado was one of 21 states to receive an F.
[b]A labyrinthine process[/b]
Sexually violent predators are determined by a four-part test. The first part requires a conviction for one of the five specific crimes.
The second part requires an offender to have been a stranger or to have established or promoted a relationship to further the sexual offense.
The first two parts of the test are simple, experts say. The third and fourth parts are where many offenders appear to fall through the system.
To be labeled a sexually violent predator, an offender must meet the first two parts of the test and either the third or the fourth. The third part of the test consists of 10 questions, four of which require a “yes” answer by the offender.
The questions include whether the offender was employed less than full time when arrested; whether the offender failed first or second grade; whether the offender has prior convictions; and whether the offender was sexually aroused during the sexual assault. It also includes an analysis of the offender’s denial, deviancy and motivation.
Veeder said some of these questions are difficult to answer. And they exclude many seemingly violent predators.
The fourth part of the test requires that the offender suffer from specific mental abnormalities that can be diagnosed. These include being psychopathic, narcissistic, antisocial and paranoid.
Morgan, the Department of Corrections spokeswoman, said in the past six years, 16 sex offenders were released who met the initial criteria but were not tested.
Of those, eight are still on parole. The DOC will require them to be tested to see whether they meet the criteria for sexually violent predators.
She acknowledged that DOC officials should have known about their obligation, because the department’s therapists and Morgan herself sat on the panel that wrote the criteria.
Part of the problem is money, officials said.
When the SVP criteria were created, no money was provided for sending therapists qualified to perform the tests to all 20 prisons where sex offenders are held, Morgan said. The state has such experts at just five prisons.
[b]“The wrong solution”[/b]
English, of the Colorado Justice Division, said that had Colorado not been forced into it by a federal mandate, the state never would have passed a law requiring community notification of the whereabouts of predators.
“The feds came down with the law, and we didn’t like it,” English said of Megan’s Law. “It’s the wrong solution to a problem that is very important. It’s hard to identify anything positive about the law.”
Community notification is misleading, English said, because it identifies only a small percentage of sex offenders – those who randomly attack children they don’t know or establish relationships with kids primarily to molest them – and leaves the impression that other sex offenders are not dangerous.
English said Colorado is one of the most progressive states in dealing with sex offenders. The state passed a sex-offender registration statute before it was required by federal law.
In Colorado, sex offenders face lifetime supervision in the community and a phalanx of rules designed to catch them even thinking about molesting kids, she said.
District judges and the Colorado Parole Board are the only ones who can designate someone as a sexually violent predator, said Joe Stommel, chief of the Department of Corrections’ Treatment and Management Program.
But in the six years since the SVP law was passed, the parole board has not requested that the assessments be done, he said.
“I’m not aware of any,” Stommel said. “Why it isn’t being used, I don’t know.”
Harlan Bockman, chief judge at Adams County District Court, said he has seen very few evaluations for sexually violent predators from the state come across his desk.
He acknowledged that there should be more offenders labeled as predators.
“I’m just amazed. I’ve never really analyzed it to see how many were charged and met the qualifications,” Bockman said.
The sexually violent predator designation is crucial, said Tool, the former state representative who sponsored House Bill 1260. Too often, he said, parents and neighbors have no idea that a predator lives nearby.
Tool, now senior director at the Colorado Division of Motor Vehicles, reviewed five cases found by The Post that fit the initial criteria. Tool said all five meet his notion of what a sexually violent predator is.
One man – Edward Tarpey, who was convicted of sexual assault in 2003 and was convicted of homicide in 1982 – lives in Fort Collins, not far from Tool’s home.
“I would want to know about him,” said Tool, who has seven grandchildren.
Tool said he believes having a review board and criteria for evaluating possible predators is necessary. But he believes they should be netting many more predators. The state legislature, he said, should require that the evaluations be done – or it could strengthen the law.
“The statute was pretty clear. It should be pretty easy to evaluate them,” Tool said. “Maybe someone needs to go back and tighten it up.”
[i]Staff writer Kirk Mitchell can be reached at 303-820-1206 or kmitchell@denverpost.com. [/i]
[i]Staff writer Sean Kelly can be reached at 303-820-1858.[/i]

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  whose DNA is in CODIS
Posted by: jameson245 - 09-03-2018, 04:11 PM - Forum: DNA - more technical discussions - Replies (9)



INDIANAPOLIS — Indiana law enforcement is entering a brave new world where police can obtain and test any Hoosier's DNA profile against crime scene evidence, so long as a prosecutor can show the person probably committed a felony.
Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb on Friday signed into law Senate Enrolled Act 322 requiring police to take a cheek swab DNA sample from every person arrested for a felony, starting in 2018.
Currently, only individuals convicted of felonies have their DNA records permanently entered into a state police database.

State Sen. Erin Houchin, R-Salem, the sponsor of the new law, said she expects police will catch more criminals once they have a bigger pool of DNA records to check against blood, fluids and other detritus gathered at crime scenes.
She also refused to rule out someday expanding the DNA collection mandate to include those arrested for misdemeanors or traffic infractions.
"DNA profiling is an accurate, widely used tool that will help law enforcement solve crimes and convict those who are responsible," Houchin said.
The new law provides that an individual's DNA sample only will be added to the state's database after a judge affirms that police had probable cause to arrest the person, which means it's more likely than not the person committed the crime he or she is accused of.
That's a significantly lower standard than the guilt beyond a reasonable doubt required for conviction.



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If prosecutors are unable to convict, the law establishes a process for the person to request his or her DNA be expunged from the state database.
However, the Indiana Code also provides that if the record is not deleted as requested, that oversight does not invalidate any future arrest or conviction based on DNA evidence that shouldn't be in the database.

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  conviction integrity unit
Posted by: jameson245 - 09-03-2018, 04:18 AM - Forum: What is in the news - staying up to date - Replies (3)

Boulder County attorneys set criteria for DA's new conviction integrity unit
[b]By Mitchell Byars[/b]
[i]Staff Writer

Posted:   09/01/2018 12:50:54 PM MDT | Updated:   about 12 hours ago[/i]



[Image: 20180831__01DCAUNITw~1.jpg]
Boulder County District Attorney Michael Dougherty in March created a conviction integrity unit, for which a set of criteria has been created to review possible wrongful conviction cases. ([i]Cliff Grassmick / Staff Photographer[/i])


The Boulder District Attorney's Office and local defense attorneys have created a set of criteria and an application process for the newly-created conviction integrity unit as it gets ready to review possible wrongful conviction cases.
Boulder District Attorney Michael Dougherty created the unit in March and since then attorneys have been meeting to decide what types of cases it will re-examine.
"I'm excited about how much progress we've made to get this up and running," Dougherty said.


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Boulder Deputy District Attorney Mark Rimaldi, who is part of the unit, said the unit will look at cases out of Boulder County in which the person has credible evidence they did not commit the crime for which they were convicted.
"There must be a claim of actual innocence," Rimaldi said. "Not that there was some issue with the legal process, or something didn't go the way they planned."
Rimaldi said there will not be a limit on the types of charges that will be considered by the unit.
"We certainly had a discussion about a limit, but we determined that different people can be affected by crimes of any level," Rimaldi said. "We thought it would be fair to review all cases based on merit."


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Josh Maximon, the co-chair of the Boulder chapter of the Colorado Defense Bar, said that cases in which the defendant is incarcerated will take priority, but it is important they look at all types of cases.
"A lot of innocence projects tend to be related to really serious cases, like murder or rape, but this unit is going to be looking at claims of innocence on every single level of alleged crime," Maximon said. "For job applications, graduate school, housing requirements, Section 8 housing, having a conviction on your record is something that is really an impediment. So even though we're giving a priority to incarceration cases, the collateral consequences of having a conviction are really significant in this society, so it's excellent we're able to look at those cases as well."
Dougherty also said that the unit will consider guilty pleas, not just trial convictions as long as there is still a claim of actual innocence.
"We recognize defendants may plead guilty when they are not in fact guilty, possibly because they are worried about the consequences of going to trial," Dougherty said.
As a defense attorney, allowing plea cases was something Maximon said he was excited about.
"There is quite a bit of pressure put on defendants to take deals, even in disputed cases," he said. "So the fact that there is an avenue for them to still be able to assert their innocence is unique and really welcomed by the legal community, specifically the defense."
Dougherty said that he is not sure how many cases the unit will handle at a time, but said it will partly depend on the circumstances of each defendant.
"A case where DNA is involved might be different than a case of mistaken identity where we have to re-interview witnesses," Dougherty said. "But I'm confident we can keep up with the cases."
Dougherty said he hopes to have the application up on the DA's website within the next two weeks. He said he has already heard from a lot of defendants who think their cases might apply, as well as from members of the community supporting the idea.
"The response from the community has been overwhelmingly positive, and I think that speaks to the desire that people have to make sure there is transparency in their government," Dougherty said.
While it is the only such unit in the state at the moment, Maximon added that a representative from the Denver DA's Office attended a recent meeting.
"It seems like the work that we're doing in Boulder might be a model for other units like this all over the state," Maximon said. "We worked really hard to try to develop criteria and standards to this process with a really dedicated aim from all areas of the criminal justice system. From the defense perspective and the prosecution's perspective, every single person there is committed to finding a potential positive result for someone who has an actual innocence claim."
[i]Mitchell Byars: 303-473-1329, byarsm@dailycamera.com or twitter.com/mitchellbyars[/i]

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  Grand Juror Speaks out 12/17/2016
Posted by: jameson245 - 09-02-2018, 05:24 PM - Forum: Grand Jury Indictments - No Replies

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Juror breaks secrecy laws to reveal he ‘knows who killed JonBenet Ramsey’
A GRAND juror in the JonBenet Ramsey case breaks secrecy laws to reveal he knows who killed her and how he was silenced over her parents.
Candace Sutton
news.com.auDecember 17, 20167:47pm


Grand Juror in JonBenet Ramsay case says he's confident he knows who's guilty





Grand Juror in JonBenet Ramsay case says he's confident he knows who's guilty 0:31
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Juror in JonBenet Ramsay case says he's confident he knows who's guilty of murdering the young pageant queen. Courtesy: ABC USA/20/20
  • December 17th 2016
  • 2 years ago
  • /display/newscorpaustralia.com/Web/NewsNetwork/Entertainment - syndicated/
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A juror in the JonBenet murder case has risked prosecution to reveal he believes he knows who killed the six-year-old beauty queen. Picture: Splash NewsSource:Supplied



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A GRAND juror on the JonBenet Ramsey case has broken strict secrecy laws to say he knows who killed the six-year-old beauty queen and reveal how he and fellow jurors were silenced.
Risking prosecution which could lead to imprisonment, the male juror has told US TV show 20/20 the shocking decision the grand jury came to almost two decades ago.
The Colorado Grand Jury convened in 1999, less than two years after JonBenet Ramsey was murdered and her body found in the basement of her multi-millionaire parents’ home in Boulder, Colorado.
[Image: 7e99e798e03a58cf30fc415fdffcdeff]
JonBenet Ramsey.Source:Supplied



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Asked to deliberate on whether JonBenet’s parents, John and Patsy Ramsey should have been indicted over the murder, the juror tells the program the panel of eight women and four men voted yes.
“They were told to indict only if they found probable cause, in other words if they found it was more likely than not that the Ramseys killed their own daughter,” 20/20s Amy Robach says.
“Was there enough evidence to indict John and Patsy Ramsey for a crime?” Robach asks the juror, who responds: “Based upon the evidence that was presented I believe that was correct.”
[Image: b0c84a8e3fde8d6d0ef48987b8a5743a]
Boulder Sheriff's officers guard the Ramsey home on December 27, 1996, the day after 6-year-old JonBenet was found dead in the basement. Picture: AP.Source:Supplied




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[Image: 7bd0491098b4687e2d5d0aaef50dc521]
This male juror (above) told TV’s 20/20 that the grand jury voted to indict John and Patsy Ramsey and he knows who killed JonBenet. Picture: 20/20.Source:Supplied



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But asked if the case had gone to trial, did he believe that the Ramseys would be convicted, the juror answered “no”.
“Based on the evidence you were presented do you feel you know who killed JonBenet Ramsey?” Robach asks.
The juror responds: “I highly suspect, I do.”
The revelation comes in a week in which the Colorado Bureau of Investigation announced it would be conducting sophisticated DNA testing on the underwear and long johns JonBenet’s body was clothed in death.


DNA analysis at the time exonerated the Ramsey family, but new evidence has come to light.
And although the grand jury voted to indict JonBenet’s parents 17 years ago, the Colorado prosecutor at the time disagreed and did not to follow through with the jury’s recommendation.
On 20/20 the juror also describes the eerie trip the grand jury made to the crime scene where JonBenet’s body was found, and how he was disgusted by her sexualised beauty pageant image.
[Image: 10f94c1051a5464e03de571a71757528]
Nine-year-old Burke Ramsey declines to draw his sister in a psychology session after JonBenet’s murder. Picture: Dr Phil.Source:Supplied
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The second page of the rambling ransom note which a handwriting expert says was written by JonBenet’s mother Patsy. Picture: Boulder District Attorney.Source:AP
Robach: “Before you were a grand juror, what did you know about the JonBenet Ramsey case?”
Juror: “Very little. I saw that there was this little girl dressed up in what was my opinion a sexual persona. It disgusted me, I turned off the TV.”
Over the course of a year, the grand jurors grappled with testimony from dozens of witnesses.
The jury took a field trip to the Ramsey home on 15th Street, Boulder, Colorado and descended the basement stairs to see the cellar where the little girl’s body had been found.
“The basement in which she was found, it was a very eerie feeling. Like someone had been killed here,” the juror said.
The 20/20 program disguised the juror’s voice and put his face in shadow to help protect his identity because Grand Jury proceedings in Colorado and elsewhere are secret.
[Image: c44bf20c421ef1212fe97806e31d910d]
The grand jurors voted to indict John and Patsy Ramsey, but prosecutors didn’t proceed. Picture: AP/The Denver Post.Source:AP
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Viewers were puzzled by Burke Ramsey’s smiling demeanour throughout a recent interview on DrPhil about his sister’s murder. Picture: Dr Phil.Source:Supplied
The interview with the juror was due to be aired on Friday night in the US, just over a week before the twentieth anniversary of JonBenet Ramsey’s death on Christmas night 1996.
The 20/20 interview includes revelations by a handwriting expert that she is sure the ransom note found at the scene was written by JonBenet’s mother Patsy.
Patsy Ramsey, herself a former beauty queen, was John Bennet Ramsey’s second wife. She died from ovarian cancer in 2006.
On the night JonBenet was murdered and her body placed in the cellar, her parents initially said she had been kidnapped.
They found a strange ransom note which claimed JonBenet has been kidnapped by “a small foreign faction” and demanded an odd ransom sum of $118,000.
The fact that the amount was similar to the sum of John Ramsey’s annual work bonus, and the language and apparently deliberate spelling mistakes in the long and rambling note made investigators believe it was bogus.
[Image: 27b284a8b9c5885106a57b86d4ae3fbf]
The grand jurors spent a year investigating the JonBenet case and were taken back to the Ramsey house to see the ‘eerie’ crime scene.



Burke Ramsey demonstrates how he thinks JonBenet died0:30
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Footage from 1997 shows how a young Burke Ramsey demonstrated his theory on how his sister was killed. Courtesy: The Case of: JonBenet Ramsey/Channel 9

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Cina Wong, the handwriting expert who examined the ransom note, found more than 200 similarities between the ransom note writer’s handwriting and Patsy’s handwriting.
This week Ms Wong said she still maintains that JonBenet’s mother wrote it.
“You will see that just with the As the ransom note writer has four different variations of the letter A, and then Patsy Ramsey uses the same variation of the four different types of As,” Wong tells 20/20.
The lead up to the anniversary of JonBenet’s murder has been filled with speculation about the potential involvement of JonBenet’s then nine-year-old brother Burke Ramsey.
Burke, now a computer software developer, raised eyebrows with his interview on the Dr Phil show, during which he smiled throughout.
Revelations were also aired about his childhood jealousy of a sister who received all the attention.
Burke Ramsey reportedly placed his own faeces in JonBenet’s bed and on one occasion hit her with a golf stick.
Dr Phil plays Burke a video of an interview between a psychologist and the nine-year-old Burke following the murder in which Burke is asked to draw, but won’t draw his sister.
It is the first time Burke has seen the footage.
Asked by Dr Phil, “Did you consciously not draw JonBenet?”, Burke answers, “I can’t remember what was going through my head, but she was gone so I didn’t draw her”.
The DNA review of JonBenet’s clothing by Colorado investigators will examine unidentified male DNA found on separate items.

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  Grand Juror Speaks out 12/17/2016
Posted by: jameson245 - 09-02-2018, 05:22 PM - Forum: Grand Jury Indictments - No Replies

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[Image: index@promo]

Juror breaks secrecy laws to reveal he ‘knows who killed JonBenet Ramsey’
A GRAND juror in the JonBenet Ramsey case breaks secrecy laws to reveal he knows who killed her and how he was silenced over her parents.
Candace Sutton
news.com.auDecember 17, 20167:47pm


Grand Juror in JonBenet Ramsay case says he's confident he knows who's guilty





Grand Juror in JonBenet Ramsay case says he's confident he knows who's guilty 0:31
[Image: ceed6864cf113318e434bdac89ac81be]
Juror in JonBenet Ramsay case says he's confident he knows who's guilty of murdering the young pageant queen. Courtesy: ABC USA/20/20
  • December 17th 2016
  • 2 years ago
  • /display/newscorpaustralia.com/Web/NewsNetwork/Entertainment - syndicated/
[Image: player]
[Image: 9ec99504c6459d54a8a2bd192f6167e2]
A juror in the JonBenet murder case has risked prosecution to reveal he believes he knows who killed the six-year-old beauty queen. Picture: Splash NewsSource:Supplied



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A GRAND juror on the JonBenet Ramsey case has broken strict secrecy laws to say he knows who killed the six-year-old beauty queen and reveal how he and fellow jurors were silenced.
Risking prosecution which could lead to imprisonment, the male juror has told US TV show 20/20 the shocking decision the grand jury came to almost two decades ago.
The Colorado Grand Jury convened in 1999, less than two years after JonBenet Ramsey was murdered and her body found in the basement of her multi-millionaire parents’ home in Boulder, Colorado.
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JonBenet Ramsey.Source:Supplied



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Asked to deliberate on whether JonBenet’s parents, John and Patsy Ramsey should have been indicted over the murder, the juror tells the program the panel of eight women and four men voted yes.
“They were told to indict only if they found probable cause, in other words if they found it was more likely than not that the Ramseys killed their own daughter,” 20/20s Amy Robach says.
“Was there enough evidence to indict John and Patsy Ramsey for a crime?” Robach asks the juror, who responds: “Based upon the evidence that was presented I believe that was correct.”
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Boulder Sheriff's officers guard the Ramsey home on December 27, 1996, the day after 6-year-old JonBenet was found dead in the basement. Picture: AP.Source:Supplied




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This male juror (above) told TV’s 20/20 that the grand jury voted to indict John and Patsy Ramsey and he knows who killed JonBenet. Picture: 20/20.Source:Supplied



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But asked if the case had gone to trial, did he believe that the Ramseys would be convicted, the juror answered “no”.
“Based on the evidence you were presented do you feel you know who killed JonBenet Ramsey?” Robach asks.
The juror responds: “I highly suspect, I do.”
The revelation comes in a week in which the Colorado Bureau of Investigation announced it would be conducting sophisticated DNA testing on the underwear and long johns JonBenet’s body was clothed in death.


DNA analysis at the time exonerated the Ramsey family, but new evidence has come to light.
And although the grand jury voted to indict JonBenet’s parents 17 years ago, the Colorado prosecutor at the time disagreed and did not to follow through with the jury’s recommendation.
On 20/20 the juror also describes the eerie trip the grand jury made to the crime scene where JonBenet’s body was found, and how he was disgusted by her sexualised beauty pageant image.
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Nine-year-old Burke Ramsey declines to draw his sister in a psychology session after JonBenet’s murder. Picture: Dr Phil.Source:Supplied
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The second page of the rambling ransom note which a handwriting expert says was written by JonBenet’s mother Patsy. Picture: Boulder District Attorney.Source:AP
Robach: “Before you were a grand juror, what did you know about the JonBenet Ramsey case?”
Juror: “Very little. I saw that there was this little girl dressed up in what was my opinion a sexual persona. It disgusted me, I turned off the TV.”
Over the course of a year, the grand jurors grappled with testimony from dozens of witnesses.
The jury took a field trip to the Ramsey home on 15th Street, Boulder, Colorado and descended the basement stairs to see the cellar where the little girl’s body had been found.
“The basement in which she was found, it was a very eerie feeling. Like someone had been killed here,” the juror said.
The 20/20 program disguised the juror’s voice and put his face in shadow to help protect his identity because Grand Jury proceedings in Colorado and elsewhere are secret.
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The grand jurors voted to indict John and Patsy Ramsey, but prosecutors didn’t proceed. Picture: AP/The Denver Post.Source:AP
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Viewers were puzzled by Burke Ramsey’s smiling demeanour throughout a recent interview on DrPhil about his sister’s murder. Picture: Dr Phil.Source:Supplied
The interview with the juror was due to be aired on Friday night in the US, just over a week before the twentieth anniversary of JonBenet Ramsey’s death on Christmas night 1996.
The 20/20 interview includes revelations by a handwriting expert that she is sure the ransom note found at the scene was written by JonBenet’s mother Patsy.
Patsy Ramsey, herself a former beauty queen, was John Bennet Ramsey’s second wife. She died from ovarian cancer in 2006.
On the night JonBenet was murdered and her body placed in the cellar, her parents initially said she had been kidnapped.
They found a strange ransom note which claimed JonBenet has been kidnapped by “a small foreign faction” and demanded an odd ransom sum of $118,000.
The fact that the amount was similar to the sum of John Ramsey’s annual work bonus, and the language and apparently deliberate spelling mistakes in the long and rambling note made investigators believe it was bogus.
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The grand jurors spent a year investigating the JonBenet case and were taken back to the Ramsey house to see the ‘eerie’ crime sceneSource:Supplied


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Burke Ramsey demonstrates how he thinks JonBenet died





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Burke Ramsey demonstrates how he thinks JonBenet died0:30
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Footage from 1997 shows how a young Burke Ramsey demonstrated his theory on how his sister was killed. Courtesy: The Case of: JonBenet Ramsey/Channel 9
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  • 2 years ago
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Cina Wong, the handwriting expert who examined the ransom note, found more than 200 similarities between the ransom note writer’s handwriting and Patsy’s handwriting.
This week Ms Wong said she still maintains that JonBenet’s mother wrote it.
“You will see that just with the As the ransom note writer has four different variations of the letter A, and then Patsy Ramsey uses the same variation of the four different types of As,” Wong tells 20/20.
The lead up to the anniversary of JonBenet’s murder has been filled with speculation about the potential involvement of JonBenet’s then nine-year-old brother Burke Ramsey.
Burke, now a computer software developer, raised eyebrows with his interview on the Dr Phil show, during which he smiled throughout.
Revelations were also aired about his childhood jealousy of a sister who received all the attention.
Burke Ramsey reportedly placed his own faeces in JonBenet’s bed and on one occasion hit her with a golf stick.
Dr Phil plays Burke a video of an interview between a psychologist and the nine-year-old Burke following the murder in which Burke is asked to draw, but won’t draw his sister.
It is the first time Burke has seen the footage.
Asked by Dr Phil, “Did you consciously not draw JonBenet?”, Burke answers, “I can’t remember what was going through my head, but she was gone so I didn’t draw her”.
The DNA review of JonBenet’s clothing by Colorado investigators will examine unidentified male DNA found on separate items.

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  plea bargains - sex offenders
Posted by: jameson245 - 09-02-2018, 04:09 PM - Forum: What is in the news - staying up to date - Replies (3)

Should I Take a Plea Bargain for a Sex Crime?
Posted on July 1, 2015 by Law Office of Brett A Podolsky
 
A defendant who is charged with a sex crime in Texas may be facing some serious legal penalties. These penalties can include jail time, fines and sex offender registration. One way to avoid the full extent of these possible penalties is to accept a plea bargain from the prosecution.
A plea bargain is an agreement between the defense and the prosecution. In many cases, the prosecution will be the district attorney. In a plea bargain, the district attorney may offer a deal to the defendant after charges have been filed and before a trial takes place.
In most cases, the plea bargain will require the defendant to enter a guilty plea in court. However, the defendant may only have to plead guilty to a lesser charge than the crime for which he or she was originally charged. Alternatively, if the defendant is charged on multiple counts, he or she may only have to plead guilty to one or a few of the total charges.
Benefits of Plea Bargains
There are several advantages for a defendant who chooses to accept a plea bargain for sexually based offenses. Some of these benefits can include:

  • Reduced jail time

  • Reduced fines

  • Conviction on a misdemeanor charge rather than a felony charge

  • Probation instead of jail time
When it comes to sexual crimes, plea bargaining is a possibility. However, a plea bargain for a sex crime may work differently when compared to other types of offenses.
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Plea Bargains and Sex Offender Registration
Mandatory sex offender registration is one of the most serious consequences for a sex crime. This mandatory registration may be valid for the remainder of the defendant’s life or for a period of several years. For defendants who receive prison time, the registration can activate once they are released from incarceration.
Registration can require a person to: Obviously, these are very serious consequences. A person accused of a sexual offense may wonder if a plea bargain can help them avoid this mandatory registration.
In reality, this may not be possible. A person who admits guilt to a sex crime for which registration is required must register as a sex offender. In general, the only way to avoid sex offender registration is accept a plea bargain for a lesser charge for which registration is not a requirement.
For example, if a defendant is charged with a crime for which registration is a requirement but accepts a plea bargain for a charge that does not require registration, that defendant could potentially avoid registration. He or she may still have to face incarceration, probation and fines but it may be worth it to avoid the stigma of sex offender registration.
Should I Take A Plea Bargain?
This is not an easy question to answer. Every case involving sex crime charges will be different. In some cases, a defendant may stand to gather a lot of advantages by accepting a plea bargain.
However, a plea bargain requires a total admission of guilt and pleading guilty to any sex crime can have serious consequences. There can be an element of public shame and humiliation that may be just as bad as jail time.
The best strategy for a defendant in this situation is to consult with an experienced attorney. An attorney may be able to examine the facts of the case and the charges that have been filed and make a recommendation. In addition, an attorney may be able to negotiate with the court for a new plea bargain that is more favorable to the defendant.
The average person will not have the knowledge or experience to negotiate with the court on their own and public defenders may be overworked or inexperienced. Hiring a lawyer as soon as sex crime charges are filed is a great first step towards building a strong legal defense that may secure a favorable plea bargain.

If you’ve been accused of a sex crime, it’s crucial to contact an experienced attorney. Brett A. Podolsky will fight to protect your rights. Call 713-227-0087 or email for a confidential consultation today!

https://brettpodolsky.com/sex-crimes/sho...-sex-crime

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