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  John Douglas book Mindhunter
Posted by: jameson245 - 10-12-2019, 09:26 PM - Forum: Disproving Myths - Replies (1)

2000 "The Cases That Haunt Us" by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker

Page 298

"Upon meeting John Ramsey, I informed him who I was, shook his hand, and expressed my sorrow for his loss. As it turned out, there was some significance to the fact that neither he nor Patsy knew who I was. Subsequent to this, several sources, including Detective Steve Thomas, reported that Mindhunter, the first book I wrote with Mark, was on John Ramsey's nightstand. In this book we deal with staging crime scenes, and some speculated that one or both of the Ramseys had read it and "learned" how to outwit investigators to make it look as if someone from outside had killed their child. First, I have to say that they--or anyone else--would not have learned this from reading the book. We didn't write a how-to-course, and any good investigator would see right through such a primitive attempt. Morover, much as we would like to think that everyone has read our books and knows who we are,
Mindhunter was not there on John's nightstand or elsewhere in the house, and I looked through the place pretty carefully. Believe me, as an author you learn to spot your books anywhere and everywhere. And it was not on the long police list of items removed from the house, although a "Dave Barry book about cyberspace" was. This is just one small example of the mountain of erroneous information that has come out about this case. While I understand that John read Mindhunter after meeting me, he was completely unfamiliar with my work at the time of the crime."

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  Ramsey reading habits
Posted by: jameson245 - 10-12-2019, 09:18 PM - Forum: odds and ends - No Replies

July 21, 1998 Linda Wilcox (former Ramsey housekeeper) interview on Peter Boyles Show

Peter Boyles: We'll talk about the police interview and we'll talk about the books by the bed. One of the stories we broke was about John Douglas' book Mindhunter being seen in the crime scene photos. You know a little bit about books by the Ramseys beds...

Linda Wilcox: Well, they each had a pile of books in the corner by the bed. Even though they had nightstands. Originally the nightstands weren't there until they redid the upstairs. And even afterwards, they tended to just throw the books there. So, I kind of knew who read what. So,
Patsy's side had things like, you know poems for women and not really what I would consider true trash-like Harlequin romances, but more like Mary Higgins Clark, woman novels. Some of them, I had even read. John's side of the bed was usually some kind of suspense-thriller. He tended to buy books by, what I call, by the numbers, I mean whatever's number 1 on the bestseller lists. Occasionally it would be something like the 7 habits of successful people, or financial things or even a (garbled) occasionally. But, generally it was some kind of suspense novel.

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  santa letter in trash?
Posted by: jameson245 - 10-12-2019, 09:17 PM - Forum: odds and ends - No Replies

Excerpts from National Enquirer book, "JonBenet, The Police Files" by Don Gentile and David Wright

1998 June 25, 26, 27 - Taped Interrogation interview of Patsy Ramsey by Tom Haney and Trip DeMuth in Colorado

NE Book Page 338:

John was then shown two photos showing a
[i]torn-up letter that was found in the trash can in JonBenet's room.[/i]

Lou Smit: "Have you ever seen a letter like that?"

John Ramsey: "It doesn't look familiar... it says,
"Somebody loves you all, Merry Christmas."

Lou Smit: "I can tell you that
these items were found in the trash can in your daughter's room and it was torn up."

John Ramsey: "Do you know what the word before "loves' is? 'Somebody loves you all.'

Lou Smit: "I am sure that has been looked at very closely. It appears to be a Santa Claus Letter."

John Ramsey: "(trying to read the torn-up letter)...
'Friend, enjoy your holidays, Christmas.' 'Well it doesn't look like anything I have seen before... and I don't know what it would be doing, you know, torn up in..."

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  flashlights
Posted by: jameson245 - 10-12-2019, 09:14 PM - Forum: odds and ends - No Replies

Excerpts from National Enquirer book, "JonBenet, The Police Files" by Don Gentile and David Wright

1998 June 25, 26, 27 - Taped Interrogation interview of Patsy Ramsey by Tom Haney and Trip DeMuth in Colorado

NE Book Page 243:

Tom Haney: "Okay. The next group of photos and these are not numbered - but they show a flashlight."

Patsy Ramsey: "Uh huh."

Tom Haney: "A black metal...type"

Patsy Ramsey: "Uh huh."

Tom Haney: "Flashlight. Do you recognize that?"

Patsy Ramsey: "It looks similar to one that John Andrew gave John for Christmas, birthday or something."

Tom Haney: "That's similar to the one that John Andrew gave John?"

Patsy Ramsey: "Yeah."

Tom Haney: "And I think last time when you were here on last April... you said, 'where that was stored?'"

Patsy Ramsey: "Uh huh."

Tom Haney: "And I want to clarify that a little bit. Do you remember where it was stored?"

Tom Haney: "The drawer that is open?"

Patsy Ramsey: "That's open there, yeah."

Tom Haney: "And that's the wet bar that's by the spiral staircase, right?

Patsy Ramsey: "Right"

Tom Haney: "Okay. Okay. and looking at photo 380, you don't see a flashlight in (the drawer), right?"

Patsy Ramsey: "Correct...where was this flashlight found?"

Tom Haney: "Well, do you remember when you came in on, in April, they showed you a picture of the flashlight? Do you recall that? You may not."

Patsy Ramsey: "No, not exactly"

Tom Haney: "Okay. This was on the kitchen counter... why would that be out?"

Patsy Ramsey: "I don't know."

Tom Haney: "Did you guys use this flashlight much?"

Patsy Ramsey: "I didn't, no"

Tom Haney: "Who did?"

Patsy Ramsey: "John used it"

Tom Haney: "What did he use it for?"

Patsy Ramsey: "I don't know, looking in the garage and the car or something like that."

Tom Haney: "Okay. Had you ever seen it on the kitchen counter before?"

Patsy Ramsey: "Not that I recall."

Tom Haney: "Would it have struck you as unusual, or would that not be outside the realm of possibilties, given the habit of the family?"

Patsy Ramsey: "It seems like it would have been unusual to have made it all the way into the kitchen, because usually if somebody was using the flashlight, they were - John was looking at something in the garage or under the car or somethig like that."

Tom Haney: "Okay"

Patsy Ramsey: "But he might, you know, I'm sure you must have asked him if he...?"

Tom Haney: "And maybe I missed it, do you know when you last saw it in the drawer?"

Patsy Ramsey: "No, I'm not for sure."

Tom Haney: "Okay, how about, do you recall of using that during say a power outage or to check on the kids at night, anything along those lines?

Patsy Ramsey: "No, I don't remember that"

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  and hence
Posted by: jameson245 - 10-12-2019, 09:08 PM - Forum: odds and ends - No Replies



2000 March 18
John and Patsy Ramsey book
"Death of Innocence"


DOI (HB) Page 234:

"John and I wrote message of appreciation to our friends to be printed on the back of the liturgy of the day. We thanked the people for their support through the past year and expressed how much their love had meant to us. We also commended on the meaning of the Christmas season and why it was important to remember the real season we celebrate this time of the year. In composing this expression of appreciation, John and I had each written a version. With both copies in hand, John dictated and I typed at the computer as we merged the two into one. Later Susan Stine and Roxy Walker made a few edits as they type it into the liturgical program.
This edited version included the phrase and, hence. Those two words turned out to be the next bombshell!"

"Actually, I have no idea why we used that phrase.
Maybe we'd seen it so many times in reading the ransom note - and having to write it over and over again for the police - that it became a part of our own subconscious vocabulary. Who know? Then again, maybe people everywhere use the phrase and, hence everyday of the week, because it's a normal part of the English language. The fact we used any set of words in our statement meant nothing more than an attempt to convey our personal feelings at the moment we were writing."

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  Hal Haddon
Posted by: jameson245 - 10-12-2019, 05:23 PM - Forum: Names to remember - No Replies

Michigan-born Haddon, 62, is a quiet man with a love of fly-fishing, legal theory and politics. He is married with no children though he has two basset hounds -- one named Atticus, after Atticus Finch the defense lawyer in the novel “To Kill a Mockingbird.” The other is named Scout.


Haddon graduated from Duke University Law School where he was editor-in-chief of Law Review. 

He represented John and Patsy Ramsey when their 6-year-old daughter JonBenet was found murdered in the Boulder family home in 1996. The parents were never officially suspects but refused to be interviewed by police for months while Haddon fended off a hostile press. The case remains unsolved.

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  Pam Griffin
Posted by: jameson245 - 10-12-2019, 03:21 PM - Forum: Names to remember - Replies (1)

Little girl gets lost in public image of beauty princess
By Cindy Brovsky
Denver Post Staff Writer

Oct. 15, 1999 - She is enshrined in the public's memory as a young, precocious blonde, prancing on the stage during child beauty pageants.
But JonBenet Ramsey was really a pretty typical 6-year-old girl, those who knew her say.
She liked kindergarten and was just starting to excel in math. She asked her family's landscaper questions about thorns on roses. She was eager for Santa Claus to visit on Christmas.
"I can tell you that JonBenet was highly intelligent,'' Shirley Brady, a former Ramsey nanny, said Thursday. "Mrs. Ramsey taught her how to answer the phone when she was just 22 months old. I called once and she said, "Hello, who is this?' When I told her "Mrs. Brady,' she said in her tiny little voice, "Who is Mrs. Brady?' She remembered when I told her it was Nanny.''
Brady came to work for JonBenet's parents, John and Patsy Ramsey, when they were living in Atlanta in the late 1980s, before they moved to Boulder in 1991. She initially was hired when the couple's son, Burke, was born, and then she helped raise JonBenet until she was 6 months old.
"In the three years I was in that house, there was never an argument, never voices raised,'' Brady said.
That's why Brady, 72, says she never has wavered in her belief that the Ramseys are innocent - even though they have always been suspects in the girl's murder. On Wednesday, Boulder District Attorney Alex Hunter announced that, after a year-long review of the case by a grand jury, no one would be charged in the case.
"I'd like to shake every one of the grand jurors' hands because they know this mother and father couldn't have hurt their child,'' Brady said. "Mrs. Ramsey survived cancer. Why would she kill the only little girl she would ever be able to have?''
In Lawrence Schiller's book "Perfect Murder, Perfect Town,'' friends are quoted saying that JonBenet's life was more than her beauty-pageant competitions.
Landscaper Brian Scott told Schiller how the little girl used to follow him around the family's Boulder yard asking numerous questions.
"Do roses know their thorns can hurt?'' she asked him one day.
Scott also remembers how JonBenet started to cry one day when she said she missed her father when he went on trips. But in the next minute, her playful side emerged.
"I saw JonBenet was scooping up the leaves from the top of the barrel and hurling them over her head into the wind,'' Scott recalled.
Barbara Kostanick's daughter attended school with JonBenet.
"I remember the first time I saw them together - they looked so cute playing on the monkey bars,'' she recalled in Schiller's book.
Pam Griffin, a seamstress who made JonBenet's pageant costumes, said the Ramseys had a loving relationship with their daughter.
"And then there was all the love in JonBenet's eyes when she spoke to her father,'' Griffin said. "Everything he said was important to her.''
Those kinds of memories don't surprise Brady. She said the Ramsey family were thoughtful of each other and very loving.
"The public never met the Ramseys, so they jump to these horrible conclusions that just aren't true,'' Brady said. "They were a loving family who never could have hurt each other. I know that is the truth.''

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  Shirley Brady
Posted by: jameson245 - 10-12-2019, 03:20 PM - Forum: Names to remember - No Replies

Little girl gets lost in public image of beauty princess
By Cindy Brovsky
Denver Post Staff Writer

Oct. 15, 1999 - She is enshrined in the public's memory as a young, precocious blonde, prancing on the stage during child beauty pageants.
But JonBenet Ramsey was really a pretty typical 6-year-old girl, those who knew her say.
She liked kindergarten and was just starting to excel in math. She asked her family's landscaper questions about thorns on roses. She was eager for Santa Claus to visit on Christmas.
"I can tell you that JonBenet was highly intelligent,'' Shirley Brady, a former Ramsey nanny, said Thursday. "Mrs. Ramsey taught her how to answer the phone when she was just 22 months old. I called once and she said, "Hello, who is this?' When I told her "Mrs. Brady,' she said in her tiny little voice, "Who is Mrs. Brady?' She remembered when I told her it was Nanny.''
Brady came to work for JonBenet's parents, John and Patsy Ramsey, when they were living in Atlanta in the late 1980s, before they moved to Boulder in 1991. She initially was hired when the couple's son, Burke, was born, and then she helped raise JonBenet until she was 6 months old.
"In the three years I was in that house, there was never an argument, never voices raised,'' Brady said.
That's why Brady, 72, says she never has wavered in her belief that the Ramseys are innocent - even though they have always been suspects in the girl's murder. On Wednesday, Boulder District Attorney Alex Hunter announced that, after a year-long review of the case by a grand jury, no one would be charged in the case.
"I'd like to shake every one of the grand jurors' hands because they know this mother and father couldn't have hurt their child,'' Brady said. "Mrs. Ramsey survived cancer. Why would she kill the only little girl she would ever be able to have?''
In Lawrence Schiller's book "Perfect Murder, Perfect Town,'' friends are quoted saying that JonBenet's life was more than her beauty-pageant competitions.
Landscaper Brian Scott told Schiller how the little girl used to follow him around the family's Boulder yard asking numerous questions.
"Do roses know their thorns can hurt?'' she asked him one day.
Scott also remembers how JonBenet started to cry one day when she said she missed her father when he went on trips. But in the next minute, her playful side emerged.
"I saw JonBenet was scooping up the leaves from the top of the barrel and hurling them over her head into the wind,'' Scott recalled.
Barbara Kostanick's daughter attended school with JonBenet.
"I remember the first time I saw them together - they looked so cute playing on the monkey bars,'' she recalled in Schiller's book.
Pam Griffin, a seamstress who made JonBenet's pageant costumes, said the Ramseys had a loving relationship with their daughter.
"And then there was all the love in JonBenet's eyes when she spoke to her father,'' Griffin said. "Everything he said was important to her.''
Those kinds of memories don't surprise Brady. She said the Ramsey family were thoughtful of each other and very loving.
"The public never met the Ramseys, so they jump to these horrible conclusions that just aren't true,'' Brady said. "They were a loving family who never could have hurt each other. I know that is the truth.''

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  bruise on her shoulder
Posted by: jameson245 - 10-12-2019, 10:12 AM - Forum: Autopsy - No Replies

   

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  They acted wrong
Posted by: jameson245 - 10-12-2019, 10:08 AM - Forum: odds and ends - No Replies

Quotes from Bynum and Beuf


DIANE SAWYER: (voice-over) When Bynum, who had lost an infant grandchild of his own, learned that JonBenet had been murdered, he rushed to a friend's house, where the Ramseys and their nine-year-old son Burke (ph) had gone to stay.

(on camera) Can you tell me about what you saw when you walked in that door?

MICHAEL BYNUM: I think I can. John and Patsy were there with family and friends, their minister. And just after I got there, everyone was -- sorry --was kneeling in the living room and praying together. And when they got through, I went up and hugged John and -- and then I went over to Patsy. She was sitting on the couch. And I had to help her up and -- and give her a hug. So that was what I found when I got there. Everyone was devastated. It was difficult.

DIANE SAWYER: (voice-over) And there is someone else who was there that night who says Patsy Ramsey had collapsed.

(From taped telephone conversation)

Dr. FRANCESCO (PH) BEUF, JonBenet's Pediatrician: She was just lying on the floor.

DIANE SAWYER: (voice-over) His name is Dr. Francesco Beuf. He was JonBenet's pediatrician. He talked to me by phone about whether Mrs. Ramsey's grief was real.

(From taped telephone conversation)

Dr. FRANCESCO BEUF: Oh, for God's sake, she was as devastated as anyone could be by a terrible loss like that. They called me to provide some tranquilizers for her. She was absolutely shattered by this.

DIANE SAWYER: And Mr. Ramsey?

Dr. FRANCESCO BEUF: He looked absolutely devastated. To me, they were the most appropriate reactions in the world. God knows, I wouldn't know how I'd react if one of my children had been murdered, particularly in such horrible circumstances. He paced and paced and paced. He and I went out for a walk for a while that night. It's the wreckage of two human beings.

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