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  theft from home?
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-27-2017, 05:42 PM - Forum: The House at 755 15th Street, Boulder, CO - No Replies

Quote: 1997-04-30: Patsy Ramsey Interrogation by Steve Thomas, Tom Trujillo

Patsy Ramsey Interrogation by Steve Thomas, Tom Trujillo
Also present, Pat Burke, Bryan Morgan, Pete Hoffstrom, Jon Foster
April 30, 1997 - Boulder, Colorado


ST: Did you ever report, previously I’ve been told that you have a video camcorder stolen from the home.

PR: Yeah.

ST: Was that ever reported to the police?

PR: I don’t remember whether it was or not. That was, I don’t know if it was. I mean, we discovered that about the time we were having carpet done and that’s when I came back from chemo and all that, and I don’t think it was, in the sale of things, you know, all that important. I must don’t remember. I remember we thought it was probably the carpet people, but you can’t prove it. I mean, we’ve lost so many cameras and…

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  The 1994 Christmas tour
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-27-2017, 05:21 PM - Forum: The House at 755 15th Street, Boulder, CO - No Replies

      Photo taken in second floor playroom

Quote: 1994-11-29: Boulder Historical Tour

The Denver Post
November 29, 1994

[snip]

BOULDER

Historic Boulder's 11th annual Historic Homes for the Holidays Tour starts Saturday. Seven homes in the University Hill neighborhood will be featured. Once a cow pasture on an isolated hill above Boulder, development began here in the 1890s, with lots selling for $ 9.22 each. Today, the neighborhood features a variety of architectural styles and mature trees.

Three of the homes were designed by Boulder's first architect and master-builder, Glen Huntington. The earliest is a finely crafted Tudor Revival at 715 12th St., built in 1923, with cathedral ceilings in the living and dining rooms. Owner Emily Lowrance calls her place "a Christmas house" because she used shades of red and green.

Huntington's 1930 design is a Jacobean/Elizabethan residence at 1500 Baseline Road, with steeply pitched roofline, gables with half-timbering, and a spacious living room.

The last of this group, a Colonial Revival, was built in 1940 at 701 Seventh St., with gabled dormers and paneled windows. A large addition was built by Cindy and Charles Jones, the owners for 12 years.


A 1927 Tudor house at 755 15th St. is being restored to its original elegance by Patsy and John Ramsey, who also are opening it to light and air. A spacious master suite with dormers has gone into the unused attic, and a sun porch became a dining room.

A 1931 Jacobean/Elizabethan home at 1427 Cascade Ave. is enlivened with mementos from the career and travels of former U.S. State Department diplomat Robert Goold and his wife Libby. A sturdy Foursquare home at 845 12th St. was built in 1908, and has recently been given a window-filled addition by new owners Arnold Jacobson and Victoria Johns.

The 1935 Colonial Revival at 770 12th St. also has been given an addition - a large sun room and master bath by owners Carol Francipane and Donald Lococo. They also modernized the kitchen from the studs out.

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  information
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-27-2017, 04:56 PM - Forum: Atlanta burglary - unrelated to murder - Replies (1)

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/478589/detail.html
02-20-2001
John Ramsey Locked Up During Botched Robbery
Atlanta Police Investigating At Scene

John Ramsey surprised a burglar in his Atlanta home Tuesday morning and fought with the man before the intruder fled, police said.

Ramsey called 911 at about 11:12 a.m., EST and said that he had scuffled with a 6-foot "tall black man" in dark clothing during a robbery at his house.

Ramsey told investigators that when he returned to his house from Home Depot around 11 a.m., he found a man going down the stairs with two suitcases in hand.

"There was a car in the driveway and the doors were all locked upstairs ... so I couldn't figure who was here, if anybody," Ramsey said during a brief interview with reporters.

When Ramsey asked the man what he was doing, the alleged intruder said that he was completing home renovations. Ramsey said that he did not believe him and when he attempted to call police, he was attacked.

Atlanta police Lt. Michael Fuller told reporters that Ramsey was choked, scratched and then subdued.

When asked by reporters after the incident if he was scared for his life, Ramsey said, "I got to thinking this may not be so good. As it got towards the end ... I got to thinking that this might not end up too good."

The alleged robber took Ramsey's wallet, forced Ramsey into a bathroom, tied the door from the outside, and continued to ransack the house, police said.

When Ramsey broke free from the bathroom, he apparently ran to his gun vault and grabbed a shotgun, but the intruder had already fled, an Atlanta newspaper reported.

Other than receiving several scratches on his face and bruises on his neck, Ramsey was unharmed.

Guns and other valuables were believed to have been stolen from the house.

"We didn't have a lot. It appeared that he took some clothes. He took my wallet in the fight, and a few other odds and ends," Ramsey said, as his wife Patsy, stood at his side.

Police continued Tuesday afternoon to search 4000 block of Paces Ferry Road for the intruder.

"So far, we have a vague description, even though Mr. Ramsey is certain that he will be able to identify this person if he sees him again," a police spokesman said at the scene. "We're in the process of getting things together. We will do a composite later today. Of course, we are looking at other some other evidence in the house that might lead to this person's identity."

Ramsey is expected be at the Atlanta police headquarters later Tuesday to help officers put together a composite and to take a look at police photos
.
"We can nail him. I think he picked the wrong house to burglarize," Ramsey said.

"He was about 6 foot 1, probably 30 years old, plus or minus, medium-brown skin, short hair, trim, well-dressed. (He) drove a light-gray bronze-colored like a Chevy Cavalier-kind of car. (He) was well-spoken," Ramsey added.

Patsy Ramsey returned to their home from Bible study at about one hour after the alleged robbery occurred.

The Ramseys have been under suspicion since their 6-year-old daughter JonBenet was found beaten and strangled in their Boulder, Colo., home on December 26, 1996.

The couple insist that they're innocent and claim that an intruder is responsible. A year-long probe into the murder of the child beauty queen led to no indictment and no arrests.

The Ramseys moved to their two-story Mediterranean-style Atlanta home, located in the suburb of Vinings, Ga., after the slaying.

John Ramsey told police Tuesday morning that he is unsure whether the alleged robber knew the identity of the homeowners. Police said that do not believe that the murder of JonBenet Ramsey and Tuesday's robbery was connected.


Quote:2001-02-20: Ramsey Atlanta House Robbery Missing Items

Items missings:

1. A Compac Lap Top computer, with power adapter pulled out of the wall taken from second floor office area.

2. Two duffel bags, one kelly green canvas with "Nashville Jet" embodied on the side. The other was a black leather/vinyl gym bag that said "Capitol City Club" on the side. The green bag was stuffed full and the black bag was about half full.

3. Jewelry from Patsy's Jewelry box was gone.

4. One small ring

5. One wedding "style" ring, flat wide band with a crest on top.

6. Burglar looked at the shot guns John Ramsey had but he didn't take any.

7. Burglar opened a gun safe located in Mr. Ramsey's dressing room closet. Mr. Ramsey said the safe was not locked.

8. A gray metal box containing personal papers and a white cardboard box containing white sheets of paper with the inscription in pink cursive "JonBenet" was also on the floor in front of the safe.

9. A 12 gauge double barrel Parker shotgun, which was broken down in a leather carrying case, was also on the floor

10. Wallet described as alligator black shiny contained John Ramsey's Georgia driver's license, Blockbuster Video card, two VISA cards, one from Merrill Lynch, and an American Express and Rich's credit card plus $300 to $400 cash in wallet.

11. John Ramsey also said he was missing papers, namely aircraft logs that were in one of the bags that the suspect carried out.







Quote:2001-02-21: Statement of John Ramsey to Atlanta Police Department



Statement of John Ramsey

On 2-20-01 Probably about 10:45 AM I came home frome a quick trip to Home Depot and there was a car in my driveway. It was a bronze gray Chevy or Ford, it was an American car from the 1980's. I went in the garage door, it was locked. I unlocked it and went in. I looked in the car from a distance and did not see anybody in the car. Checked the front door of the house, it was locked. So I was not sure who are where this person was that drove the car.

Heard steps coming down from the second floor and went into the front entry hall and met a man in the hall who had just come down from the second floor. He was probably 6'1, 30 years old or there abouts, black male, medium brown skin, stocky build, not heavy, well dressed, composed and he was carrying two bags that I recognized as mine. I asked him who he was, he said he was a workman. I said "How did you get in". He said the door was unlocked. I said what are you doing with the bags. He said those are my tools. He asked who I was. I told him I owned the place.

I tried to take one of the bags form him. He would not release it. I told him I was going to call the police. I turned around to go to the phone. He grabbed me from behind around the neck. He said "Are you going to let me go". We scuffled for four to five minutes. I was trying to get free and get out of the front door, because we were in front of the house. I did get the door opened, but was unable to break free to get out.

At that point I realized that I needed to let him have his way so that he would leave. During the struggle, the socks that he was wearing on his hands, came off, but he was quick to put them back on. He put my arm behind my back, grabbed my collar and pushed me into the first floor bath and told me he would not hurt me if I stayed in there.

He tied the door closed with one of my coats which was lying near by. He questioned me about when my wife was coming back. Asked me where there was more money and jewelry in the house. I told him there was none. He asked me that a couple more times. During the struggle he had taken my wallet. I thought I heard the front door open quietly, and I waited a minute, called out to him and got no response so I





Page 6
02/21/2001 Atlanta Police Department

quickly got out of the bathroom and called 911. I had gone upstairs and got a shot gun because I was not sure where the guy was.

Question and Answer session conducted by Det. Tarvares:

Q: Approximately how long were you at the Home Depot?
A: Probably thirty minutes.

Q: Was the vehicle parked in your drive way, wa it bronze or gray?
A: I would say it was kind of a dirty white gray. Kind of silver gray. It had a emblem that was flat on the grill. It had gray cloth interior. When I looked to see who was in the car, I notied that.

Q: From the time you saw the suspect, approximately how long you think he was in your home?
A: About fifteen minutes.

Q: Do you have anything that you want to add to this statement?
A: He was dressed casual, but neat. Dark slacks, dark tennis shoes I think. He had a jacket on, it was dark brown or black. He had a knit golf shirt on which had horitzonal green. Close hair cut. He looked well groom. He was very composed, well spoken.

Q: After the robbery, what did you notice missing?
A. A Compac Lap Top computer, with power adapter pulled out of the wall. Two duffel bags, one kelly geen canvas with Nashville Jet embodied on the side. The other was a black leather/vinyle gym bag that said Capitol City Club on the side. The green bag was stuffed full and the black bag was about half full. Patsy's





Page 7
02/21/2001 Atlanta Police Department

Jewelry was gone out of the jewelry box. It was mostly costume jewelry. A small gold ring, wedding style ring, flat wide band with a crest on the top. He looked at the shot guns that I had, but did not take any.

Q: Did the suspect have a weapon, or did he lead you to believe he had a weapon?
A: I did not see a weapon, nor did he say that he had one.

Q: Did the suspect speak with an accent?
A: It was noticeable articulate and calm.

End of statement.... 9:45 HR


Quote:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NATIONAL EXAMINER
March 13, 2001
COVER HEADLINE: DID JONBENET'S DAD FAKE NEW BREAK-IN?
His Story is Full of Holes! -- Insider says

STORY HEADLINE: John Ramsey Story Full of Holes -- says insider DID JONBENET'S DAD FAKE LATEST BREAK-IN?......just like little beauty's murder scene

STORY:

By Art Dworken

John Ramsey faked the recent break-in at his Atlanta house, charges an insider close to the still-unsolved murder of the Ramseys' 6-year-old daughter JonBenet.

Ramsey claims he was attacked and beaten by a burglar he surprised in his Atlanta home.

"But when you look at the holes in the story about this alleged break-in, it looks like it was staged in the same way the murder of JonBenet appears to have been staged to mislead cops toward an intruder," says the insider.

"This break-in never really happened."

Ironically, the incident occurred just days after the Ramseys learned they'll have to testify under oath about their daughter's 1996 murder as part of a $50 million defamation lawsuit filed against them by a Boulder, Colo., detective.

The trial will take place in Atlanta, the jurors will be from Atlanta -- and publicity about the break-in will almost certainly affect their perception of the Ramseys, says the insider.

"The timing of this latest 'break-in' is exquisite," the insider says. "While Lin Wood, the Ramseys' lawyer, is appearing on the Today show, John claims he's being attacked in his home hundreds of miles away almost at the same time.

"Now John can argue that: See, once again he's been victimized by an intruder. But as far as we know, he's the only witness to this recent break-in and assault, which is one reason I suspect this was just more spin-doctoring to draw sympathy to him and his wife and deflect attention from the truth.

"Even an arrest doesn't eliminate suspicion that this was a set-up."

According to the insider, the break-in story is full of holes:

** In one version he was forced inside a closet and the door then blocked with a grandfather clock. But another report has him being forced into a bathroom and tied in from the outside. It's hard to understand how a grandfather clock becomes confused with a rope.

** Ramsey said he was punched in the face repeatedly by a 6-foot-tall, 200-pound black male, yet there did not appear to be a cut or visible bruise on his face. And police spokeswoman Marion Hills tells THE EXAMINER: "My understanding is that Mr. Ramsey wasn't hurt.

"There was certainly no reference to any injuries sustained by Mr. Ramsey in our report."

** Ramsey told police he'd gone out on a 20-minute errand and returned around noon. "That's a very small window of opportunity for a stranger to find his way inside the house and go from room to room looking for valuable," says the insider.

** "The Ramseys' home is located in one of Atlanta's most well-to-do areas, in which all the homes have very good security systems, the insider explains. "In addition, there's a Neighborhood Watch program, all of which makes it highly unlikely that an intruder could sit on the street casing the joint in a 'brownish or gray Chevy Malibu' -- a description Ramsey gave the cops of the suspected getaway car -- without being detected."

** There were supposedly guns in a vault, yet the intruder failed to steal a shotgun -- a hot-ticket item that could bring big bucks on the street.

Ramsey's attorney denies his client staged the burglary. "When you review the investigative records, you will be impressed with the professional investigation conducted by the Atlanta Police Department," attorney Lin Wood tells The EXAMINER

But this isn't the first time the Ramseys have said they were the victims of an intruder.

"This is, in fact, the third break-in claimed by the Ramseys," says the insider. "There was the one December 26, 1996 -- the night of JonBenet's murder -- a second incident is described in their book The Death of Innocence and now this alleged third encounter with a burglar.

"This is just one more reason why I suspect John Ramsey fabricated this highly suspicious situation."


Quote:FROM 2001-03-12: REPORT: Special Agent Peter W. McFarlane (FBI) of the GBI-FBI Crime Scene Specialist Unit


21-0112-24-01
Page 18

On Tuesday, February 20, 2001, at 11:40 AM, Special Agent Peter W. McFarlane (FBI) of the GBI-FBI Crime Scene Specialist Unit recieved a request from Major Ted Hall, commander of the Personals Crimes Unites, Atlanta Police Department, to assist in the processing of a crime scene at 4070 Paces Ferry Road NW, Atlanta, GA, the residence of John and Patsy Ramsey.

Agent McFarlane arrived on scene at 12:44 PM and met with Detective Frank Tavarez and Sgt. Archie Ezell of the Atlanta PD Robbery Squad.

They advised that Mr. Ramsey's house was reportedly burglarized and he confronted the burglar, who attacked him. Mr. Ramsey was subsequently locked in a bathroom by this individual described as a black male.

Mr. Ramsey advised the suspect made off with two carrying bags, (1) an Irish green duffel bag with words "Nashville Jet" and (2) a black duffel bag with the words "Capitol City Club on the side.

Mr. Ramsey indicated that the suspect was coming down the stairway from the second floor when he confronted him carrying these bags. He asked him who he was and he indicated that he was a workman. Mr. Ramsey also asked him what he was doing with the bags, knowing that these bags and possible contents belonged to Mr. Ramsey.

Mr. Ramsey also indicated that the suspect was wearing socks as gloves, either dark blue or black. He advised that at that point he ended up in a confrontation and struggle with this individual, who subsequently locked him in the bathroom on the first floor adjacent to a sitting room adjacent to the kitchen. The door was held closed with





21-0112-24-01
Page 19

Mr. Ramsey's brown leather jacket, which was tied to the grandfather clock support post next to the bathroom door.

Mr. Ramsey indicated that upon searching the house he found that his Compaq lap top computer and power source had been taken from a second floor office area.

He further indicated when he came into the house, which was through the kitchen door, he noted a tan colored Chevrolet Cavalier parked in the driveway which was back in, which he suspected belonged to the perpetrator.

Agent McFarlane surveyed the scene and called for assistance from ASAC David T. Mitchell (GBI) and Agent Carol Ann Johnson (GBI) also of the GBI-FBI Crime Scene Specialist Unit.

It is noted that the house faces north onto Paces Ferry Road but the entrance is from a side driveway from River Forest Drive on the east side of this house.

The house is a two-story brick house with full basement.

Upon surveying this scene it was evident that the suspect had been in the house for a period of time. It is noted that Mr. Ramsey indicted that he had left the house unattended and had gone to the Home Depot store to shop and subsequently returned cathing the intruder.

The suspect entered the house through the rear basement door in the lower west side of the house. He used a shovel to pry the door open, which was left behind.

Various shoe impressions were left in the sand at this entrance as well as the shovel.





21-0112-24-01
Page 20

ASAC Mitchel processed these impressions, making appropriate Hydrocal casts.

The suspect opened various drawers to chests and dressers on the first floor and second floor bedroom areas.

He also opened a gun safe located in Mr. Ramsey's dressing room/clothes closet area. According to Mr. Ramsey, the safe was not locked.

A gray metal box containing personal papers and a white cardboard box containing white sheets of paper with the inscription in pink cursive "JonBenet" was also on the floor in front of the safe.

A 12 gauge double barrel Parker shotgun, which was broken down in a leather carrying case, was also on the floor.

Agent McFarlane initially photographed the injuries to Mr. Ramsey's face, head and neck areas.

Upon taking these photographs Mr. Ramsey indicated to Agent McFarlane that he fought with the intruder and was forced in the bathroom adjacent to the sitting area on the first floor next to the kitchen.

The door had been tied shut with Mr. Ramsey's coat and a towel tied to the grandfather clock support post to the outside door handle to the bathroom. A multi-Allen wrench tool was used to secure the coat sleeve to the grandfather clock post.

Mr. Ramsey advised he did not want to get injured any further by this individual so he did not come out of the bathroom until he felt the intruder had left.





21-0112-24-01
Page 21

Mr. Ramsey further indicated to Agent McFarlane and Atlanta detectives that his wallet which was described as an alligator black shiny wallet containing his Georgia driver's license, Blockbuster Video card along with two VISA cards, one from Merrill Lynch, and an American Express and Rich's credit cards were in the wallet.

He also indicated that he was missing papers, namely aircraft logs from his residence and they were in one of the bags, which the suspect was carrying out. He also indicated that he was missing $300-$400 cash which was in his wallet.

Agent McFarlane photographed the exterior and interior of this house as well as the bedroom and study areas and the areas where the perpetrator opened the drawers to the various chests and closets. These areas and drawers were processed for latent fingerprints by Agent Johnson with the use of Redwop powder and an alternate light source known as a Luma-Lite, all with negative results.

No fingerprints of value were recovered from these drawers.

Agent McFarlane processed the safe door and glass on the various closet doors in Mr. Ramsey's dressing area, recovering various latent lifts of unknown value.

Agent McFarlane collected the gray metal box and white cardboard box to be processed later for latent fingerprints at the GBI Crime Lab.

Agent McFarlane also photographed the broken entrance door to the basement area. The lock had been bent and forced open and the keeper and doorjamb had been broken.

The basement door was processed for latent fingerprints, inside and out.





21-0112-24-01
Page 22

Photographs with black and white film were used to photograph latent fingerprints developed on the outside of this door, above the lock, 48 1/2" from the door and two inches from the edge of the door.

It is also noted ASAC Mitchell located tire impressions at the left front (north side) of the entrance to the driveway, whereby casts were made.

Also a Home Depot receipt was recovered on the floor in front of the bathroom where Mr. Ramsey was held. It read February 20, 01, 10:42 AM for the purchase of door hinges.

All items of evidence and casts recovered at this scene were so noted on GBI Receipt for Property Sheets #E-202718 and E-202717, respectfully.

Agent McFarlene, along with ASAC Mitchell and Agent Johnson, departed this scene at 9:00 PM.

ID DATA: Victim: John Ramsey, W/M
DOB: (blacked out)

Special Agent Peter W. McFarlane: 03/09/01
03/12/01:je

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  MY evidence taken by police -
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-27-2017, 03:31 PM - Forum: Press Releases /Official statements - No Replies

After a news story stated that I had evidence, attempted to get it properly checked and the police had refused to have it tested, I got a call from Chief Beckner saying he WOULD have it tested.  This story followed.

http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/lo...75,00.html
Tipster provides possible DNA evidence in Ramsey case
By Owen S. Good, News Staff Writer
August 17, 2001

BOULDER -- Police Chief Mark Beckner has asked a state lab to test possible DNA evidence, given to him by an Internet tipster, with genetic traces found in the JonBenet Ramsey murder investigation.

The Colorado Bureau of Investigation also will examine DNA evidence from a former suspect in an unsolved Arapahoe County murder for possible links to the Ramsey case.

Beckner, confirming the testing, said so little is known about the source of the DNA that he can't say if it will produce a meaningful lead.

"I don't have enough information on where it came from to even tell you whether it's worth a look," Beckner said Wednesday. "We're doing it just to cover all our bases, and if something pans out, super, great."

It is at least a new lead in a five-year investigation that has focused on the girl's parents, John and Patsy Ramsey, as suspects in her death. The case has appeared to grind down since a grand jury disbanded without an indictment in 1999.

While police figures say more than 100 suspects have been considered, and people continue to be interviewed, DNA testing has "dwindled down" lately, Beckner said. The number of interviews stood at 590 in June 1998 and increased to "roughly 600" in the past three years, according to city press releases.

While the chief is taking evidence of unknown origin and testing it without the name of a possible suspect in mind, he said it is not an endorsement of a so-called "intruder theory." It still examines the possibility that a stranger murdered JonBenet, 6, whose body was found Dec. 26, 1996.

"I wouldn't characterize it as moving in any direction other than investigating the crime and trying to answer unanswered questions," Beckner said. "And wherever it leads us, it leads us."

]The tipster, who goes by the Internet name Jameson in maintaining a Ramsey case Web site, said the sample is a "personal belonging" of a man who lived in the Boulder area at the time of the murder. It contains hair and bodily fluid traces, she said, and was mailed to her eight months ago by "someone intimate" with the man, who suspected his involvement.

Jameson wanted written assurances from Beckner that he would test the item before she turned it over, but Beckner had been reluctant to give them, she said. She said he verbally agreed last month.

"I can tell you that the person has been talked about in Boulder as a suspect," she said, although she withheld that name from the police.[/font][/size]
[/color]
Unknown male DNA was found underneath JonBenet's fingernails and in her panties. The Ramseys are not the source.

"I really do think JonBenet got a piece of her killer, and he left something behind," said Lou Smit, whom Beckner has criticized for taking his intruder theory public. "Some day, that is going to catch him."

Smit said he is "really encouraged" Beckner is doing the DNA testing. "I hope that they do more," he said. "It must be worth something or they wouldn't test it."

Beckner characterized the DNA comparison as part of ongoing laboratory tests. "We are still doing DNA tests, and we are doing DNA tests on some things that have been submitted," he said.

Beckner could not say how many other tests have been performed this year. "It's dwindled down significantly," he said. "There aren't many we ask for now."


Sheriffs' detectives in Arapahoe County received a similar DNA tip from Jameson earlier this year, according to Detective Rick Fahlstedt. Testing showed enough of a link that the person was brought in and gave a voluntary sample, which eliminated that person as a suspect, he said.

Jameson said the person also lived in the Boulder area at the time of the Ramsey murder. She also gave the person's name to Beckner. The chief thinks the CBI may have already examined it for Ramsey links.


"Any DNA that's tested by CBI is compared against their entire database," Beckner said. "It's basically an automatic kind of thing."

Atlanta attorney L. Lin Wood, who is representing the Ramseys in three civil lawsuits, said he was "slightly" encouraged by the news.

"I'd be more encouraged if I saw the police taking aggressive actions to solicit new tips and new leads, to take this case off the shelf and genuinely go back and revisit it start to finish," he said.

Contact Owen S. Good at (303) 442-8729 or goodo@RockyMountainNews.com.

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  Burke's room
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-27-2017, 02:28 PM - Forum: Rooms - No Replies

   

Burke's bedroom was on the second floor.  Immediately outside his bedroom door was the staircase leading to the third floor and another to the front hall.  Melinda's room would have been to the left, opposite the stair and his bathroom.   Straight ahead was a hall leading to the playroom and beyond that was the addition to the house where JonBenet had her bedroom.

Burke's room was wallpapered with World War I fighter planes, and a large wooden propeller hung over the small windows. Two TV sets and a VCR shared a bookcase with a fish tank. His room was not where Disney movies were kept, he enjoyed learning programs such as 'Practicing Landing" and "First few Hours of Voyage".  He also had a computer in his room but no internet access as far as I know.

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  The butler door
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-27-2017, 02:19 PM - Forum: The House at 755 15th Street, Boulder, CO - No Replies

   


The rather low number on the photo indicates it was taken in the earlier morning hours on December 26th


2000 March 18 - John and Patsy Ramsey book, "Death of Innocence"


DOI (HB) Page 270:

"The investigators spent a great deal of time talking with me about a large diagram of the house on the wall behind me. I later learned that they also used the same diagram with Patsy. I was shocked to see that they had found the butler kitchen door, which led to the outside, open. This was reported by one of our friends when he arrived shortly after six in the morning. I'd never even noticed that open door as we frantically rushed around making phone calls, and yet there on the police diagram of our home was the note: "Door found open."

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  Who had keys to the house
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-27-2017, 01:40 PM - Forum: The House at 755 15th Street, Boulder, CO - Replies (1)

According to Schiller/Brennan

Who had keys to the Ramsey house?


Fleet White (friend) - PMPT 179
Jay Pettipiece (painter) - PMPT 435
Joe Barnhill (neighbor) - PMPT 179
John Andrew Ramsey - PMPT 179
John Ramsey - PMPT 179
John Fernie (friend) - PMPT 179
Linda Pugh (housekeeper) - PMPT 179
Linda Wilcox (housekeeper) - PMPT 145
Patsy Ramsey - PMPT 179
Nedra Paugh (relative) - PMPT 179
Suzanne Savage (babysitter) - PMPT 145


1999 February 18 - Lawrence Schillers book, "Perfect Murder, Perfect Town

Page 179:

"In April 1997, Ellis Armistead, an investigator hired by the Ramseys, would tell the police that there were twenty more extra keys outstanding. In the end, however, the detective could find only nine poeple who said they had keys. Six of the keys were returned. Three were missing. The Police soon learned that the front door locked automatically when it closed."

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  Paula Woodward on CNN!! March 3rd
Posted by: Summer Dawn - 02-26-2017, 03:03 PM - Forum: What is in the news - staying up to date - Replies (19)

Tune in on March 3rd... 8-11 pm eastern,CNN will be having a special on JoBenet featuring author Paula Woodward!!  It should be good!!! 



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  Alie Berrellez
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-22-2017, 12:23 PM - Forum: Boulder crimes - No Replies

Not Boulder but close

Resolving 1993 murder of Englewood 5-year-old took an advances in forensic science



By Kevin Vaughan | The Denver Post
PUBLISHED: October 8, 2011 at 2:47 pm


[url=http://www.denverpost.com/newstips/][/url]











Detective Bobbie Garrett pulled down a three-ring binder, opened its vinyl cover and began reading the 275-page summary of one of Colorado’s most notorious cold cases.

It was January — nearly 18 years after a brown-eyed 5-year-old girl named Aleszandra “Alie” Berrelez vanished from the courtyard outside her Englewood apartment, sparking a four-day hunt that ended in the heartbreaking discovery of her body. Her killer had stuffed her into a canvas bag and tossed her down a hillside in Deer Creek Canyon.

As Garrett began the latest look at case No. 93-9789 — the kidnap and murder of little Alie Berrelez — the paper trail alone filled 37 three-inch binders and two file boxes at the Englewood Police Department. Garrett, an investigator in the crimes against persons unit for more than a decade who had worked the case off and on over the years, settled in to take a fresh look.
Alie’s disappearance and the subsequent discovery of her body had captivated people across the Denver area, in part because of the bloodhound, Yogi, who led officers from her apartment to Deer Creek Canyon, where her body was found.
What the public never knew was that later Yogi led investigators from Deer Creek Canyon back to the Golden Nugget Apartments, and that a second bloodhound, Becky, took them right to apartment 106A — and that both dogs identified both the prime suspect and two cars he had driven.
As Garrett sat down in January to look again at Alie’s disappearance and murder, she saw the extensive circumstantial case against the man who lived in that apartment — a drug user and drifter who died in 2001 after years of hard living.
The first step was to examine the case summary, which detailed the work of the original detectives in 1993 and 1994.
The story started, at the top of Page 1, at the beginning.
“On May 18, 1993, at approximately 7:02 p.m., the Englewood Department of Safety Services Police Division Dispatcher Vern Elder received a phone call from Marivel Berrelez . . . Marivel Berrelez stated that her 5 year old daughter was missing.”

Garrett read on.
Alie was in the courtyard of the Golden Nugget Apartments with her two brothers. . . . A neighbor watching the children slipped into her unit for a few minutes, and when she returned, Alie was gone. . . . Soon, other officers swarmed the horseshoe-shaped complex but found no signs of Alie. . . . Alie’s 3-year-old brother, Sam, told the officers she was with a man “and they went in a car.” . . . Three days after Alie vanished, a police bloodhound named Yogi sniffed a pair of the little girl’s underpants and began working around the apartment courtyard before heading to Broadway, then south to C-470, and ultimately to the mouth of Deer Creek Canyon. . . . Four days after Alie disappeared, searchers that picked up where Yogi left off saw a green canvas bag in a ravine. . . . An officer opened the bag and saw Alie’s lifeless body.
On Page 18, Garrett saw the first mention of a man who had come into investigators’ sights the same day Alie’s body was found. A man who lived in unit 106A but had boarded a train to California.
As Garrett read, she experienced what she would later describe as “red flag upon red flag.” She continued, jotting down occasional questions, thinking about what else she might do that hadn’t already been done. When she was finished, she’d reached the same conclusion as her predecessors: The man who lived in unit 106A was Alie’s killer.
Detectives had tried in 1994 to press charges against him after building a case that was strong but circumstantial. Prosecutors, however, decided there wasn’t enough, and no arrest was made — despite repeated efforts, in the ensuing years, to find the clue that would tip the balance irrevocably toward a suspect.
Now Garrett considered her options. What she decided would crack the case.
Unraveling the truth
Solving a cold case — any cold case — can be a matter of luck or advanced technology or shoe leather.
Luck, as in a furnace repairman’s 1995 discovery of a wad of women’s underwear secreted in a duct that led to an arrest in the 6-year-old unsolved murder of Susan Doll.
Advanced technology, as in the 2008 arrest in the rape and murder more than 30 years before of Holly Andrews — a case solved with a DNA match.
Shoe leather, as in the 1983 Boulder murder of Sid Wells that yielded, earlier this year, an arrest warrant for the longtime suspect in the case, Thayne Smika, obtained after detectives and prosecutors went through everything again, conducted new interviews, and determined they had enough to go to court.
When Becky, the second bloodhound, walked right into the open door of that unit four days after Alie vanished, maintenance workers were cleaning up — the previous tenant had abruptly moved out.
The previous tenant was 32-year- old Nicholas Randolph Stofer.
An examination of Englewood’s case files paints a portrait of Stofer as a young man with a lot of problems.
Born Nicholas Randolph Schultz, he’d gotten a new name after his mother remarried and his stepfather adopted him. He grew up in the Littleton area, and by age 15, he was drinking and using drugs and engaging in sex with a male classmate. He later served in the U.S. Navy but was bounced out on an “other than honorable” discharge and drifted, married and divorced twice, found jobs and lost them, and used massive amounts of drugs and alcohol.
On June 2, 1993, 15 days after Alie vanished, investigators had their first contact with Stofer. In a telephone interview, Stofer claimed that around the time of Alie’s disappearance, he’d been talking with two other tenants in the complex. He said that while they were chatting, he saw Alie’s mother looking for her in the courtyard. And he said he then headed out to a pay phone in front of the complex to make calls.
But those other tenants told a different story — that when they’d left for a bingo game, Alie was still in the courtyard. Phone records showed Stofer hadn’t made any calls.
As Garrett went over everything, she saw one curiosity after another linking Stofer to Alie’s disappearance and death.
Alie was barefoot when she was found, and seven people described Stofer as having a “foot fetish” — two of them said he’d talked of being sexually attracted to small, female feet. . . . Stofer bought an Amtrak ticket to California the day Alie disappeared, then moved up his departure and was on the train when her body was found. . . . Stofer was inside his apartment as officers searched for Alie but never answered his door. . . . Stofer borrowed a Buick two days after Alie vanished, claiming he needed to go to Hudson to get his last paycheck from a railroad job but had, in fact, been fired and paid two months earlier. . . . A friend who’d helped him move into the Golden Nugget Apartments saw a green canvas bag exactly like the one used to conceal Alie’s body. . . . Alie’s brother, Sam, in multiple conversations with a psychologist, said he’d seen “the old man” take her. . . . On two separate occasions, Sam took investigators to apartment 106A after being asked where the “old man” lived.
And Garrett saw more compelling evidence, courtesy of the two dogs.
In August 1993, Yogi and Becky, in separate exercises at different locations, were given a gauze pad to sniff that had been wiped around inside the green canvas bag. And each dog then picked out Stofer’s Subaru, and later the borrowed Buick, from among a series of vehicles parked together.
And then, in April 1994, there was more. Investigators obtained a court order requiring Stofer to appear in a lineup. He and four others — three police officers and a firefighter — stood next to designated cones in a lot at a training center used by law enforcement officers from Arapahoe and Douglas counties. More than a half-mile away, a handler let Becky sniff the gauze pad.
The dog then zig-zagged her way more than 1,000 yards until the five men were in sight. Becky sniffed her way right up to Stofer, stopped in front of him and nudged his right hand.
A little later, Yogi was given the same gauze pad. He, too, worked his way to the men, jumping on Stofer when he reached him.
Later that year, investigators took the case to prosecutors in the office of then-Arapahoe County District Attorney Bob Gallagher. The prosecutors decided the case wasn’t strong enough.
Garrett saw some of the things that may have given them pause, things that could have been exploited by a defense attorney. That Sam had initially said the man who took Alie was black. That both Yogi and Becky had shown keen interest in the same apartment a block from the Berrelez home — an apartment with no ties to Alie or Stofer. That while the carpet fibers found on Alie’s clothing matched the green shag in Stofer’s apartment, they also matched the floor covering in seven other units in the building. That doctors never determined with certainty how Alie died — perhaps, they theorized, it was a result of a severe asthma attack. And, of course, that dogs can’t talk.
Still, Garrett believed the evidence pointing to Stofer far outweighed that which threw his guilt into question, and so as she thought about her next step, she believed DNA testing — much more advanced than what existed at the time Alie was killed — was her best bet.
On Feb. 8, she filled out the paperwork to send several items to the Colorado Bureau of Investigation: The green canvas bag in which Alie’s body had been found, and her shoes, underwear, jumper, shirt, headband and hair tie.
It was Garrett’s best hope, and yet she knew it might yield nothing.
“You always submit things hoping they’re going to come back with something,” she said. “But they often don’t.”
Months passed. Garrett worked other cases.
Closing the case
Tuesday, Aug. 31. The phone on Garrett’s desk rang.
“Investigations, Garrett,” she answered.
On the other end of the line was Gentry Roth, a CBI forensic scientist.
The call started with small talk. Roth told her about his memories of the case — especially Yogi, the bloodhound. He asked her a few questions about Stofer — how it was he came to be a suspect, whether he was a family friend, whether he would have been around her.
“So,” Roth finally asked, “wanna know what I did?”
“What?” Garrett asked excitedly.
Garrett’s mind raced. Submitting the evidence again had been a risk — testing can, in effect, destroy the chance to test again in the future when technology may be even more advanced.
But Roth told her how he’d run moistened cotton swabs over Alie’s clothing, then tested them. And how that testing had yielded two DNA hits — both from Alie’s underpants.
One was a partial genetic profile, and Stofer could not be eliminated as the source of it. Because the profile was not complete, Roth could not say with a “reasonable degree of scientific certainty” that it came from Stofer. But what Roth could say was that the odds of it coming from someone else were, at a minimum, greater than one in 100 million. At the same time, he found a second partial profile, this one known as a Y-STR. It is a DNA profile that is male-specific and is passed from fathers to sons. And it, too, matched Stofer.
Because the samples were so small, Roth could not tell her what had left the DNA. It could have been anything — drops of sweat, or saliva, or a few skin cells.
No matter. Garrett had DNA consistent with Stofer’s on the underpants Alie was wearing when her body was found. And with that, she had the final clue she needed to close the books on a case that frustrated her and many other investigators and left Alie’s family in limbo for more than 18 years.
About 20 feet and an open area separate Garrett’s desk from the office of Englewood Police Chief John Collins, who as a young detective had worked some on the Berrelez case in the early years. Collins could tell Garrett was on the phone with someone, and then he heard her yelling.
“Stop what you’re doing,” she yelled to Collins. “You better sit down. . . . This is kind of big.”
A moment later, Garrett burst into his office.
“We have a DNA hit,” she said excitedly.
“On who?” Collins asked.
“Alie’s case,” Garrett said.
“Stofer?”
“Yep.”
Kevin Vaughan: 303-954-5019 or kvaughan@denverpost.com

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  hearing scheduled
Posted by: jameson245 - 02-19-2017, 03:03 PM - Forum: Burke sues Werner Spitz for $150,000,000.00 - Replies (2)

A hearing in this case is scheduled for Feb. 24th, 2017 at 10 in the morning. Dr. Werner Spitz's motion for summary disposition will be ruled on. 

I hope they don't settle, that there are depositions and a trial exposing just how wrong CBS was when they put on their program;  I think they lied to their "experts" and would love to see that come out.  If I am wrong, I welcome THAT information.  Just tell the truth and get this solved.

But I fear Lin Wood is more interested in the money than the truth.  I expect a quiet settlement and a hush from Werner Spitz.

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