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  The truth about the Boulder Police Tip Line
Posted by: jameson245 - 08-05-2017, 07:14 PM - Forum: To submit a tip - Replies (3)

I have a document from November of 2002 that says there are 3500 tips in a computer program that are part of the BPD files.
As on that date - November 2002, less than 5% = = FIVE PERCENT - - of those tips had been followed up, acted upon.  Tipsters received no call back for most tips received.

The DA's office submitted 400 leads and as of that date only about 100 had been dealt with.

This "cold case" has a lot of potential if the files were to be opened and investigators encouraged to follow the evidence and find this killer.

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  DNA on nightgown
Posted by: jameson245 - 08-05-2017, 07:00 PM - Forum: DNA - more technical discussions - No Replies

POlice have taken the pink nightgown to the lab - and that has confused me because she was not wearing the nightgown - - but the fact is there were small spatters of blood on the nightgown - it was JonBenet's blood.  

Spatters, not smears like the killer wiped his hand on the nightgown.  That according to police notes I have seen.

Any thoughts on that?

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  SBTC
Posted by: jameson245 - 08-05-2017, 05:50 PM - Forum: Linguistics - Ransom Note - No Replies

What could it mean?

Saved By the Cross - Patsy did it theory

Santa Barbara Tennis Club - Chris Wolf did it theory

And here's one that is used to bolster the case against Joe Barnhill Jr.  
In the house of the father, Joe SENIOR, there was a photograph of an airplane that the father was very proud of.  I don't know if he owned it or what the story was behind it but the name of the aircraft, the numbers on the side, were SB2C

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  DA Stan Garnett on the GJ indictments
Posted by: jameson245 - 08-05-2017, 10:32 AM - Forum: Grand Jury Indictments - Replies (1)


.pdf   ramsey+editorial.pdf (Size: 634.11 KB / Downloads: 6)

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  Interesting news story
Posted by: jameson245 - 08-05-2017, 10:21 AM - Forum: Nancy Krebs - Replies (3)

DA pursues new Ramsey lead
Hunter asks police to investigate woman's story of sex abuse By Barrie Hartman Camera Staff Writer [c] Feb 25 2000 Boulder Publishing Inc.
District Attorney Alex Hunter has turned over new information to Boulder police and the FBI that he says could provide a major breakthrough in solving the 3-year-old JonBenét Ramsey murder case.
The information is from testimony and documents provided voluntarily by a 37-year-old California woman who was brought forward by Boulder attorney Lee Hill. The woman said she has suffered a lifetime of sexual and physical abuse, beginning at age 3. Her story, if true, could mean the Ramsey case is tangled in sexual abuse and involves more people than originally thought. Hunter said he finds the woman to be "very believable." Boulder police detectives, however, aren't so sure.
"Even if only 15 percent of what she says is true," Hunter said, "this case warrants investigation. And if Boulder cops don't want to do it, I will take the case to the U.S. Attorney."
Police Chief Mark Beckner said Thursday, "Though our detectives did not find her to be credible, we are taking what she said seriously.
"I'm interested in finding the truth no matter where it leads us."
Beckner said the first thing his detectives will do is perform a thorough background check of the woman and meet with her therapist of 10 years in an attempt to corroborate her story.
Hill, who is a former San Diego County deputy district attorney and former special assistant U.S. attorney and is experienced in investigative work, said, "She is among the most credible witnesses I have ever interviewed." He is representing the woman in her decision to give information to authorities.
The woman has described to police years of sexual and physical abuse in California homes at the hands of adults who stayed at holiday and other parties after other guests had left for the evening. Then, she said, another "party," one of sexual abuse for the gratification of a select group of adults, would begin.
In talking to detectives, the woman draws parallels between sexual techniques used at these sessions and the physical evidence of garroting that investigators found on the body of JonBenét Ramsey. The woman told detectives she believes JonBenét was killed accidentally when an asphyxiation technique used to stimulate an orgasmic response during a child sex and porno "party" went too far.
The woman told police she knows firsthand about asphyxiation (choking) to produce a sexual response because it had been done to her when she was a child. The woman said in her experience little girls were dressed provocatively and trained to say provocative things, such as, "It's a pleasure to please you." She told police that when girls did not perform as expected, they were struck on the head. That was because their hair covered the wound. A big night for such "parties" was Christmas night, she said. Over the years, she said, many parties were held then because a large number of cars around a house did not arouse suspicion in the neighborhood and the children had a full week to heal from their wounds before returning to school.
JonBenét Ramsey's death occurred overnight Christmas 1996. The autopsy report concluded she suffered a blow on the head and was strangled. The woman said she knows the Ramseys through the Fleet White family. She said the godfather to her mother is Fleet White Sr., 86, of California. Fleet White Jr. of Boulder and John Ramsey were close friends until the death of JonBenét.
White Jr. was with John Ramsey when JonBenét's body was found in the basement of the Ramsey's Boulder home. White Jr. has since been crusading for Hunter's ouster from this case for refusing to prosecute the Ramseys. Ramsey's attorney, Bryan Morgan, declined comment. Fleet White could not be reached Thursday.
Police cleared White as a suspect in April 1997.
Attorney Hill said the woman came forward because she was fearful for her life. She came to believe that people involved in child sexual abuse in California were becoming suspicious that she might try to talk to authorities. Hill said her main reason, however, was to try to save "other innocent victims who can't speak for themselves" from further sexual abuse.
The woman and her therapist of 10 years, Mary Bienkowski, saw Hill being interviewed on Fox television about a deposition he had taken of John Ramsey in a libel suit against a supermarket tabloid. They decided to contact him. The Camera's efforts to reach Bienkowski have been unsuccessful.
Hill, struck by what he heard, traveled to San Luis Obispo near Los Angeles on Feb. 11. He spent five hours interviewing both the woman and her therapist, and he videotaped supporting documents, which included personal notes, cards and family photographs that the woman says are from the Whites, both senior and junior.
Hill recounted details of the interview to Hunter in a meeting Feb. 16. With him was Stephen Singular, a Denver author who has pursued the Ramsey case for three years and is convinced the killing is linked to child sexual abuse. Both men expressed to Hunter intense frustration about the reluctance of police to consider evidence that deviated from their theories.
The woman called Hill again Saturday, and he arranged for her to fly to Denver. He picked her up at 12:30 a.m. Sunday at Denver International Airport and found safe housing for her.
Hunter immediately tried to arrange for detectives to interview the woman. Two detectives interviewed her at 3 p.m. Tuesday for nearly five hours. It was during that interview that Hill learned Boulder police had received a missing person's report on the woman. A relative of the woman filed the report with San Luis Obispo authorities, who called Boulder police. Boulder police, Hill said, responded that she was in Boulder and would be interviewed by detectives at 3 p.m. Tuesday. They also told San Luis Obispo police she was with Lee Hill.
"I couldn't believe it," Hill said. "We had told police her life was in danger; then they tell everyone where she is and what she is doing."
Police Chief Beckner said he thought it was his department's responsibility to respond to the missing person's report. Hill says police should have asked the witness whether she wanted them to respond.
The Ramsey case has been quiet for the last several months, following a 13-month grand jury investigation that prosecutors said did not find enough evidence to bring an indictment in the case.

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  witnesses
Posted by: jameson245 - 08-05-2017, 10:16 AM - Forum: Grand Jury Indictments - Replies (2)

Quote: 1999-09-22: Rocky Mountain News: Ramsey grand jury to hear new witnesses

http://insidedenver.com/extra/ramsey/0922jury1.shtml
Ramsey grand jury to hear new witnesses
Parents of slain girl not subpoenaed to testify
By Charlie Brennan
Denver Rocky Mountain News Staff Writer
September 22, 1999

BOULDER -- The JonBenet Ramsey grand jury will hear from new witnesses when it returns to work Thursday, according to a source close to the case.

And they're not John and Patsy Ramsey.

The parents of 6-year-old JonBenet, considered suspects in their child's Christmas night 1996 slaying, still have not been subpoenaed to testify before the grand jury probing her murder, the source said.

The Ramseys, who now live in Atlanta with their 12-year-old son, Burke, have steadfastly maintained their innocence.

The grand jury's 18-month term expires Oct. 20. Exactly who will testify is unclear.

Burke Ramsey is the only family member known to have testified before the eight-man, four-woman panel. His testimony came just prior to the grand jury's May 25 meeting, which was followed by a layoff lasting all summer.

The list of those not yet called as witnesses contains another surprise.

A former executive at Access Graphics, the $1 billion Boulder computer software firm where John Ramsey worked as president and chief executive in 1996, said no one from that company has appeared.

"I don't know anybody from Access who has been called," said the executive who stays in touch with past and present company officials.

A 21/2-page ransom note Patsy Ramsey said she found in the house Dec. 26, 1996, when JonBenet was discovered missing suggested a possible business connection in the murder.

The note said the culprits represented "a small foreign faction" who told John Ramsey "we respect your business, but not the country that it serves."

Former FBI criminal profiler John Douglas, hired by the Ramseys, also concluded the crime was likely committed by someone outside the family, and possibly by someone with a business-related grudge against John Ramsey.

Scott Robinson, a Denver attorney who has followed the case closely, said the fact that apparently, few people -- if any -- from John Ramsey's former business have testified, could be telling.

"It means either the Boulder police have exhausted, independently of the grand jury, every slimly related lead, or the grand jury -- for whatever reason -- has focused elsewhere in the search for JonBenet's killer," said Robinson.

"The police, in general, have long had the Ramseys as their principle and apparently sole suspects. But even with that in mind, it would be beneficial to any eventual prosecution to rule out business jealousy or business-related anger as a potential motivation for the murder of JonBenet."

Robinson said the fact that more witnesses are scheduled to appear before the panel, which resumes its meetings Thursday after a four-month break, shoots down one popular theory.

"This suggests that the jury has not been spending the last few weeks working out the bugs on a report, in lieu of indictment -- which had been a plausible explanation for the hiatus," said Robinson, "and that they have not yet decided what to do. They want to make sure that no voice goes unheard before reaching a determination."

Those who have not yet appeared include former Ramsey neighbor Melody Stanton. Stanton, who has since moved out of Boulder, lived across the street from the Ramseys and told police she heard a child's scream not long after falling asleep Christmas night.

Her comments to police about the scream have been the subject of much analysis for what that scream might say about the possible time of death, and for what it might say about where, in the Ramseys' expansive home, the killing might have taken place.

Authorities have never specified a time of death in the case. The Ramseys told police they put JonBenet to bed shortly after arriving home from a party shortly after 9:30 p.m. on Christmas night.

Among those witnesses who might still be scheduled could be some of the same case investigators who passed through the courtroom in the grand jury's first days last fall.

Former prosecutor Dave Heckenbach, who ran grand juries for the Denver district attorney's office from 1986 to 1992, pointed out that as recently as early summer, some of those detectives were still actively interviewing witnesses and seeking additional evidence.

"If they've done a lot of work, between the last time they met and now, the grand jury would have to meet a few times -- or have one megasession, depending on how much work the police have done in the interim."

Grand Jury witnesses

Some of the people known to have testified before the Ramsey grand jury:

Mike Archuleta -- Private pilot who was scheduled to fly the Ramseys to their Michigan vacation home the day after Christmas 1996.

Linda Arndt -- Now-retired Boulder Police detective, the first investigator on the scene.

Dr. Francesco Beuf -- JonBenet's pediatrician.

Debbie Chavez -- Colorado Bureau of Investigation forensics expert.

John Douglas -- Former FBI criminal profiler hired by the Ramseys.

Michael Everett -- Among the first Boulder Police detectives assigned to the case.

John and Barbara Fernie -- Friends of the Ramseys who were summoned to the home after JonBenet was discovered missing.

Richard French -- One of the first Boulder patrol officers on the scene. He searched the house shortly after arriving, without locating JonBenet's body.

Ron Gosage -- Boulder Police detective working the case from its first days.

Pam Griffin -- Ramsey family friend and seamstress who assisted with JonBenet's beauty pageant costumes.

Jane Harmer -- Boulder Police detective involved in the case from the beginning.

George Herrera -- CBI fingerprints expert.

Linda Hoffmann-Pugh -- Ramseys' housekeeper at the time of JonBenet's death.

The Rev. Rol Hoverstock -- Minister from the Ramseys' church, summoned to the home in the first hours of JonBenet's disappearance.

Larry Mason -- Boulder Police sergeant removed from the case in its second week when he was wrongly accused of leaking information to the press.

Dr. John Meyer -- Boulder County coroner; he performed the autopsy on JonBenet.

Fred Patterson -- Boulder Police detective, among the first on the scene.

Carol Piirto -- Burke Ramsey's third-grade teacher.

Merv Pugh -- The husband of Linda Hoffmann-Pugh; he had done some work at the home a month before the murder.

Burke Ramsey -- JonBenet's brother, now 12, the only person other than her parents known to be in the house at the time she disappeared.

Lou Smit -- Retired Colorado Springs homicide detective who worked on the case for the district attorney's office.

Tom Trujillo -- A Boulder Police detective on the case since its earliest days.

Chet Ubowski -- Colorado Bureau of Investigation handwriting analyst who concluded that Patsy Ramsey may have written the ransom note linked to JonBenet's murder.

Barry Weiss -- Among the first Boulder patrol officers at the Ramsey home.

Fleet and Priscilla White -- Ramsey friends called to the house the morning of JonBenet's disappearance. Fleet was in the basement with John Ramsey when the child's body was found.

Tom Wickman -- The Boulder police detective sergeant who has supervised the investigation since the early days.

September 22, 1999

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  BODE reports
Posted by: jameson245 - 08-05-2017, 09:42 AM - Forum: DNA - more technical discussions - Replies (3)

       

March 24, 2008 – These are the results of the Bode Lab/Technology examining the waist band of the long john to compare it to the 1997 DNA results from the panties.

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  To submit a tip
Posted by: jameson245 - 08-02-2017, 02:28 PM - Forum: To submit a tip - No Replies

Anyone can submit a tip to the Boulder Police Department - they are in charge of the investigation now.

There are a few groups of investigators outside the BPD working on this case but they tend to do so without letting anyone know who they are or what they are doing.  They feel they can get more done without having people watching and reporting what they do - and I fully respect that.  But the same secrecy that allows them to work their magic also cuts them off from tips.

I don't believe the Ramsey attorneys have a tip line anymore.  If they do, I have missed that.  People can still call on them, but I think the best they can do is to pass on the information - they are lawyers, not investigators.  And I know for a fact that all of the lawyers associated with this case will NOT pass on tips - - not their job to solve this and they don't pretend otherwise.

SO - having said all that.....   I am in contact at times with many people associated with this case, from reporters to investigators to law enforcement to the Ramseys themselves.  I have gone to them with information that I have felt needed to be investigated and I believe I have their ear when it is important.

What I will not do is pass in a name with no file attached - a file that makes it clear and convincing that a person needs to be considered a viable suspect.   Many times I have been approached by someone I think is mad at another person and out to cause problems for that person - - and I am, frankly, not willing to put MY name on such a file as a good lead.   Other times the tip is so vague it would be next to impossible to follow up on - - and, again, I simply tell that tipster to send in the tip on their own as I am known to call in only reasonable leads.

Example - a couple found a website dealing with bondage and pedophilia.  They knew the name of the man who set up the web site and he lived miles from the Ramsey house.  He was into drugs and posted about that addiction on his web page.  He wrote a bit about that Christmas, his time with his family then his "escape" to do as he pleased that night.  He had an association with CU Boulder and may have met John Andrew there or seen JonBenet in the mall.   There was more but the point is I had a name, an interest in children and bondage, the opportunity to do it and more.

I turned in that tip and believe it was given the proper attention - though, to be honest, I have not seen where his DNA was tested so have not cleared him from my personal suspect list.

I am still willing to turn in reasonable tips - not only to the Boulder Police but to others who might be willing to take a look.  But I will not put my name on a vague file.  No name, no evidence of any interest in pedophilia, true crimes like kidnapping and murder,  no evidence that they were near Boulder that night - - that is a deal breaker.

My email address is jameson245@aol.com

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  Movies in the ransom note
Posted by: jameson245 - 08-01-2017, 11:00 AM - Forum: Linguistics - Ransom Note - Replies (5)

Thought I would share this Frank Coffman opinion piece here for those looking for clues in the note.  A few of the facts at the end are wrong but he hits the movie stuff pretty well.


The Premeditated Murder of JonBenet



By Frank Coffman


       "...there are at least two people that know who did this, and that is the killer and

         someone that that person may have confided in." - Patsy Ramsey, May 1


    Ever since JonBenét Ramsey was found dead, there have been signs that her murder was a premeditated crime, not a spur of the moment act.  The method of killing indicates a degree of planning; she was strangled with a garrote, made by attaching a nylon cord to a stick.  The person who prepared that instrument of murder obviously thought ahead and wasn't just acting on a momentary impulse.

    Now, there is more evidence of premeditation.  The ransom note shows signs of being conceived in advance of the murder.  According to published reports, some of the ransom note was derived from movie plots and dialogue, which are quoted fairlyu accurately, indicating that the writer must have seen these movies in the recent past.

    Incredibly, the killer drew upon Hollywood movies for guidance on how to concoct a believable ransom note.  One line in the ransom note is obviously lifted directly from the movie "Speed" (1994).  The ransom note contains the quip: "Don't try to grow a brain," which is the same line that the psycho-killer blurts out in "Speed."

    The writer of the ransom note also borrowed from the plot to "Dirty Harry" (1979), another film about a psycho killer who tried to extort a ransom.  As in "Dirty Harry", the note asserts that the kidnapper will be watching covertly and that the ransom exchange will be a physical ordeal. 

    The note writer also liked the warning in "Dirty Harry" about not talking to anyone, not even to a dog, which turned up in the ransom note as don't "talk to a stray dog."  The note used obscure lines of dialogue that no one would be able to recall unless he had watched the film recently.

    The killer turned to movies about ransom situations for ideas about how to disguise the murder as a kidnapping.  The killer staged the fake abduction to divert suspicion away from himself.  There is evidence the ransom note was written in the house.

    Soon after the murder, some observers noticed similarities between the ransom note and the movie "Ransom," which was playing in Boulder at the time of the murder.  In "Ransom," Mel Gibson plays a self-made multi-millionaire businessman (which describes John Ramsey) whose child is grabbed by a group of kidnappers led by a man who dislikes the father.

    The note-writer's memory of these films, as reflected int he note, are too intact for him to have simply recollected films he saw years ago.  He must have reviewed movies about kidnappings shortly before the murder.  Only movies with ransom plots show up in the note.  He seems to have worked out the kidnapping charade before he committed the murder.

    What can we tell about the killer from the language in the ransom note?  The note-writer uses correct English.  There is no bad grammar, no profanities, no slang.  The note has proper margins and indented paragraphs.  The writer seems to be educated.

    The threats in the ransom note are stated in a conservative, almost polite form:
    "The two gentlemen who have your daughter don't like you.  We advise you not to provoke them ... We respect your business, but not the country it serves  ... We advise you to be well rested."

    This is hardly the language of the street.

    The note's mannerly style indicates that a sophisticated person was trying to sound like a criminal.  he borrowed tough talk from movies, but his true identity keeps showing through.  For instance, instead of asking for the money in a suitcase, the note specifies "an attache case," the mark of a businessman or professional person.

    If there was an intruder, he seems to know his way around the Ramsey home.  He found JonBenét's bedroom without disturbing the other occupants.  The intruder didn't stumble into the wrong bedroom or wake up anyone.  He wasn't a stranger to the house.

    Some commentators have theorized that the murder started as an accident, perhaps during a family fight, when JonBenét was struck with a blow intended for someone else.  But that theory fails because if she was hit in the head by accident, one of her parents would have dialed 911 or rushed her to the emergency room to save her life.  They wouldn't have proceeded to strangle her to death, unless there was a desire to kill her in the first place.

    There is no sensible way to explain away heer death as an accident.  JonBenét was struck in the head with a well-aimed blow of great force, enough to fracture her skull and knock her out.  She was then strangled.  The cause of death was "asphyxia by strangulation."

    There are indications that JonBenét was killed in her bedroom: when she was found dead, her body was wrapped in a blanket from her bed and dressed in a nightie.  Her brother knows nothing about the murder because he was asleep.  Presumably, JonBenét had also gone to bed.

    The crime apparently occurred after bedtime, which is hardly the time for a parent to get into a violent fight with a child.  The circumstances don't fit a rage killing.  Apparently, JonBenét was in her bed, possibly sleeping, when someone with murderous intent entered her room.

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  Franks opinion in 1997
Posted by: jameson245 - 08-01-2017, 10:58 AM - Forum: Frank Coffman - Replies (1)

I have an very early opinion piece (1997) written by Frank Coffman before he turned BORG.  I thought I would share it today just so new followers of the case can see exactly what we mean when we say people changed over time - - and ask themselves (in the light of the real evidence we have) WHY???

I would note that while we knew about the contents of the note, Frank had some other information wrong, like that she was hit in the head before she was strangled and that she was found wearing a nightie.  But documents released after this piece cleared up those issues (unless you are BORG).


The Premeditated Murder of JonBenet


By Frank Coffman


       "...there are at least two people that know who did this, and that is the killer and

         someone that that person may have confided in." - Patsy Ramsey, May 1


    Ever since JonBenét Ramsey was found dead, there have been signs that her murder was a premeditated crime, not a spur of the moment act.  The method of killing indicates a degree of planning; she was strangled with a garrote, made by attaching a nylon cord to a stick.  The person who prepared that instrument of murder obviously thought ahead and wasn't just acting on a momentary impulse.

    Now, there is more evidence of premeditation.  The ransom note shows signs of being conceived in advance of the murder.  According to published reports, some of the ransom note was derived from movie plots and dialogue, which are quoted fairlyu accurately, indicating that the writer must have seen these movies in the recent past.

    Incredibly, the killer drew upon Hollywood movies for guidance on how to concoct a believable ransom note.  One line in the ransom note is obviously lifted directly from the movie "Speed" (1994).  The ransom note contains the quip: "Don't try to grow a brain," which is the same line that the psycho-killer blurts out in "Speed."

    The writer of the ransom note also borrowed from the plot to "Dirty Harry" (1979), another film about a psycho killer who tried to extort a ransom.  As in "Dirty Harry", the note asserts that the kidnapper will be watching covertly and that the ransom exchange will be a physical ordeal. 

    The note writer also liked the warning in "Dirty Harry" about not talking to anyone, not even to a dog, which turned up in the ransom note as don't "talk to a stray dog."  The note used obscure lines of dialogue that no one would be able to recall unless he had watched the film recently.

    The killer turned to movies about ransom situations for ideas about how to disguise the murder as a kidnapping.  The killer staged the fake abduction to divert suspicion away from himself.  There is evidence the ransom note was written in the house.

    Soon after the murder, some observers noticed similarities between the ransom note and the movie "Ransom," which was playing in Boulder at the time of the murder.  In "Ransom," Mel Gibson plays a self-made multi-millionaire businessman (which describes John Ramsey) whose child is grabbed by a group of kidnappers led by a man who dislikes the father.

    The note-writer's memory of these films, as reflected int he note, are too intact for him to have simply recollected films he saw years ago.  He must have reviewed movies about kidnappings shortly before the murder.  Only movies with ransom plots show up in the note.  He seems to have worked out the kidnapping charade before he committed the murder.

    What can we tell about the killer from the language in the ransom note?  The note-writer uses correct English.  There is no bad grammar, no profanities, no slang.  The note has proper margins and indented paragraphs.  The writer seems to be educated.

    The threats in the ransom note are stated in a conservative, almost polite form:
    "The two gentlemen who have your daughter don't like you.  We advise you not to provoke them ... We respect your business, but not the country it serves  ... We advise you to be well rested."

    This is hardly the language of the street.

    The note's mannerly style indicates that a sophisticated person was trying to sound like a criminal.  he borrowed tough talk from movies, but his true identity keeps showing through.  For instance, instead of asking for the money in a suitcase, the note specifies "an attache case," the mark of a businessman or professional person.

    If there was an intruder, he seems to know his way around the Ramsey home.  He found JonBenét's bedroom without disturbing the other occupants.  The intruder didn't stumble into the wrong bedroom or wake up anyone.  He wasn't a stranger to the house.

    Some commentators have theorized that the murder started as an accident, perhaps during a family fight, when JonBenét was struck with a blow intended for someone else.  But that theory fails because if she was hit in the head by accident, one of her parents would have dialed 911 or rushed her to the emergency room to save her life.  They wouldn't have proceeded to strangle her to death, unless there was a desire to kill her in the first place.

    There is no sensible way to explain away heer death as an accident.  JonBenét was struck in the head with a well-aimed blow of great force, enough to fracture her skull and knock her out.  She was then strangled.  The cause of death was "asphyxia by strangulation."

    There are indications that JonBenét was killed in her bedroom: when she was found dead, her body was wrapped in a blanket from her bed and dressed in a nightie.  Her brother knows nothing about the murder because he was asleep.  Presumably, JonBenét had also gone to bed.

    The crime apparently occurred after bedtime, which is hardly the time for a parent to get into a violent fight with a child.  The circumstances don't fit a rage killing.  Apparently, JonBenét was in her bed, possibly sleeping, when someone with murderous intent entered her room.

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