A thread on the book
#1
http://www.topix.com/forum/news/jonbenet...E5Q1BVDTA6

Includes lots of quotes
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#2
OK, so we know in the beginning, the Ramseys asked their friends not to give interviews, be public. This was largely in response to the public reaction to their early CNN interview that the BORG police, media and Internet posters twisted to hold against both John and Patsy.

There came a time when Linda McLean and a couple others decided enough was enough. John's friend, Jim Marino, went public and defended his friend and Linda McLean went to Patsy and FINALLY got permission to write a book. Patsy's friends were eager to contribite and this is the result.

This is the last paragraph of the introduction:

We are a variety of people of different ages from different parts of the country who are coming together with one common bond: WE BELIEVE IN PATSY AND JOHN RAMSEY WITH ALL OUR HEARTS. We have faith in human reason. We have faith in normal people.We believe that when you ger to know Patsy and John you will realize how wonderful they are. You will know in your heart that this father did not kill his little girl. You will know in your soul that this mother did not kill her baby.

Next some words from Susan Storck Ross. Patsy's mother, Nedra, worked for Susan's father. She grew up knowing Nedra and spoke about visiting with Nedra after the murder, after all JonBenet's family had been vilified in the press.

"I recently had lunch with Nedra. She worries about her daughter and wishes Patsy would rest more. She talked about John lovingly, as though he was a son, not just a son-in-law. We remembered how it was over 40 years ago and wondered why things had to happen as they do. Her hands were gnarled from arthritis but she still had that beautiful smile thaat I remembered so well. I cried for her, for all that she has had to face and for what is yet to come." Susan spoke of her own loss of a son, and then said, "...it's beyond my comprehension to think that the media would hound the Ramseys and the Paughs during their grief. It's beyond my understanding how reporters can attack and try to destroy other members of the family. I know in my heart that they are wonderful people and I send them my prayers."

Linda discusses Patsy's high school years and describes Patsy as a hard worker, a good student who was a joiner, liked competition but was also willing to help others achieve their dreams. Her family was supportive of all three girls, and that included pageant involvement. She was liked by her classmates, one of 4 students chosen by the class to speak at graduation.

And that leads to the first supportive statements from a classmate, Diane Dunn McClure.

A long quote is in the book, I will hit the highlighta here. They became good friends when Diane moved into Patsy's neighborhood. That was the 7th grade and their friendship went on until Patsy passed. Diane said, "... her children were her life."

The last paragraph of her interview:
I think in my heart that people would probably not be questioning Patsy and John if it were not for Susan Smith'a murder of her two sons. That story destroyed out trust in her as a mother and we were betrayed by her plea of innocence. But I am here to shout that Patsy is not that mother! She is not capable of anything like this. She is a good, warm, kind person - the very best! We all love her. And P, we always have been and always will be here for you!
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#3
Page6 is a letter from graduating Patsy to her teacher, Linda McLean. She comments on how Linda's "get up and go" made a difference in her senior year. She makes it clear she hopes to be friends with her teacher for years to come. Patsy wants to be there when Linda and her husband build a family. I am including this to show some of Patsy's personality. She valued people, relationships, friendships.

#6 Saturday Jan 7
Next is a bit from Patsy's cousin, Debbie Shepler Krieg. She starts out talking about how close she was to Patsy, Polly and Pam, about their very normal and happy childhood together. She and Patsy were especially close since they were born just weeks apart. This is what she has to say about Patsy: 

"...she was fair and generous and loving with everyone she met. She didn't get angry -- or gossip -- or hold a grudge -- or wish ill will to anyone. Everyone loved Patsy because she was just plain good! And she's the same today as she was then. I am not saying this because of the book. I am repeating what I have said many, many times: Patsy is the best and kindest person I have ever known."


Judy Mason Schoch met Patsy in the fourth grade and ended up growing up with her - went to college together, joined the same sorority. He is someone who knew Patsy well. Said Patsy was a "nice person", "not the least bit stuck up", "sweet and a little corny". 

This is the last paragraph in her interview:

It is agony to see a friend of yours go through something like this -- to deal with such a tragedy and then all of the publicity.... people talking, accusing, drawing their own conclusions without knowing the facts. I hate to go to the grocery store because of the junk printed about the Ramseys. I hope P-Paugh feels my thoughts and prayers -- that's all I can give her at this time. Except that I can publicly proclaim my absolute faith in the wonderful little girl, the loyal high school teammate, the college sister, the faithful college survivor and the terrific mother I know as my friend, P-Paugh!"

Patsy had been crowned Miss West Virginia and was going to compete for Miss America. Linda McLean was her friend and helped her prepare for that event. Linda writes that "... she had SOMETHING SPECIAL and the judges saw it. She was as unpretentious and real as anyone you could meet. I think you can tell when someone is genuine, when her smile is sincere, when her heart is generous. That's what everyone who meets her thinks of Patsy."

Throughout the book, Linda is making a point:
"There is no dark side here -- no built up hostility or examples of deviant behavior. There's nothing to look back on which might cause someone to later become a monster. She was a talented young lady with a loyal family and good friends. This is just another chapter in the life of someone who was good and kind and genuine and generous and happy. And she made others happy."

Betty Smith was Patsy's official chaperone during her run for the Miss America crown. Betty and her husband Jim wrote a note to be included in the book and these are their words:

"All the years we have known Patsy, she has been one of the kindest and most generous persons we know. " "I do not know anyone who doesn't admire or like her." "...we love Patsy and know for sure she had nothing to do with the murder."

The book was originally intended to be a place for friends to speak out, but when Patsy's sisters heard about it, they wanted to be included so in Chapter 4, there is a lot from Pam and Paulette. Clearly they supported their sister and John. I will pick a few lines to share.

Pam said,
"Did we argue like most siblings? No. But it wasn't because I didn't try. It's just that it takes two to argue and Patsy wouldn't. From childhood she's been one of those peacemakers who seem to have the ability to calm a storm. I can't remember hearing her yell; I have often envied her inner peace. She is more than just polite; she doesn't like to see anyone upset and would rather give in than fight."

There are pages of memories, she clearly loved her sister, not just as a sister but as a friend.

On John, Pam writes, "He is non-judgemental, he is fair; he always looks for the positives in other people." "WE have gone through the best of times and the worst of times and I have witnessed what a truly remarkable man he is." "... a thoughtful and caring man."

She ends describing Patsy as "... the daughter every mother wishes she had, the wife every man dreams of, the mother every child deserves."


Paulette is called Polly by her sisters and her letter to Linda is a sweet peek into Patsy's tween years. Polly speaks of Nedra putting her three girls in the car, making a round of Senior Centers where the girls would perform. If Polly was old enough to have an act with a "talking dog", Patsy would have been 10-12 years old. Patsy would dance, Pam would sing and Polly had the animal act. Natural entertainers, comfortable in front of all kinds of people, these people enjoyed making others smile.

She notes the time when the family faced Patsy's serious cancer fight, tells how it was Patsy comforting her, telling Polly everything would be OK, to have faith.

She describes Patsy as a "wonderful mother and aunt, a best friend."

Claudia McCutcheon was married and living in Atlanta with her husband when his sister, Stephanie, and her friend Patsy came for a visit. They introduced the girls to the man living upstairs in the apartment complex - and so John and Patsy met.

"I realize parents are sometimes suspected in cases like this, but I couldn't believe it when some of the media began to take it seriously. The possibility that it would go this far was beyond me. I had faith that the police would soon discover how good these two people are and they would get on with finding the real murderer. But they didn't.
That's why I want to finally speak out. People need to know the truth. For too many months, people have only heard one side. It is so frustrating. The truth doesn't sell newspapers. So I just have to say I would give all that I own for the world to know that these wonderful, unselfish people could not have been involved in any way. They are good people. They are good friends."

Marcia Shurley knows the Ramseys from their lives in Atlanta, starting out in a church group for couples. The met in the 1980's and reconnected after the murder when the Ramseys moved back to Atlanta.

"You just feel better when you are with her. She is always aware of what is going on in others' lives. She is always ready to share the load." " 'Sincerity" is a word that describes her well." "She is the same wonderful person we met over 15 years ago and we would do anything to ease her pain."

"Patsy has a gift of giving. She encourages others to give just by her example. It's like a magical effect. And she never wants the credit. She is selfless, making an effort to include everyone and wanting to give others credit." "She may not be a saint, but she is as close to one as I have seen."

Another friend from church, Mary Justice, shared more about Patsy and her faith, their friendship. Patsy went above and beyond to help Mary when she (Mary)was battling her cancer. She wrote, "I can't believe that anyone would think Patsy could have been involved in any way." and " I believe in her with all my heart and soul."

Regina Orlick told of meeting Patsy at their sons' school. Regina was new to the area and wore jeans to a school meeting - a bad choice and she felt very out of place. Patsy introduced herself and they have been friends since. 

"She always thinks of others; she is always willing to give of herself. With all that she's been through, she is still willing to open up and trust other people. She still believes that people, in general, are good." "She is such a good mom. She never raises her voice (like I do). She is patient and kind and fun to be around."

"She is one of the least pretentious people I have ever met; she's so real. There's no phoniness or arrogance about her. Once I saw the kind of person she really is, I thought, "If only people knew this person I have come to know, they would realize that she couldn't be involved with anything like the media implies." I have had friends in New York, who upon learning I am friends with Patsy, have asked me, "Are you sure?" YES, I am absolutely sure about her!!"

"Patsy is a beautiful, unselfish soul. You meet so few people like this in your life. I feel blessed to know her."

Melinda Ramsey

I've never called her mother, because I already have a wonderful mother; I call her Patsy. But I think of her as my "special mom". I first met Patsy when I was 7 or 8 years old, after my parents had been divorced for a couple of years. For some reasons, one of my first impressions was that she seemed so full of energy. As we got to know each other, we grew very close and still are. We are not related by blood but we are related by love.

"Patsy was always so much fun to be around! I vividly remember the family playing Bingo and Charades together. When it was our birthday, she always made a fuss. This was our "special day' and the birthday child was the center of attention. Patsy was always interested in whatever I was doing at school. I remember when I ran for student council in junior high, she helped me make posters and buttons and practice my speech. Patsy always thinks of others. She always puts other people's feelings, wants and needs above her own. It makes her happy to make other people happy. And that's what makes her so special.

I've never called her mother, because I already have a wonderful mother; I call her Patsy. But I think of her as my "special mom". I first met Patsy when I was 7 or 8 years old, after my parents had been divorced for a couple of years. For some reasons, one of my first impressions was that she seemed so full of energy. As we got to know each other, we grew very close and still are. We are not related by blood but we are related by love.

Patsy was always so much fun to be around! I vividly remember the family playing Bingo and Charades together. When it was our birthday, she always made a fuss. This was our "special day' and the birthday child was the center of attention. Patsy was always interested in whatever I was doing at school. I remember when I ran for student council in junior high, she helped me make posters and buttons and practice my speech. Patsy always thinks of others. She always puts other people's feelings, wants and needs above her own. It makes her happy to make other people happy. And that's what makes her so special.

I know it's hard to be a step-parent. You are somewhere in the middle - like a "fill-in". But Patsy was always genuinely glad to see us; she treated us like her own children. It meant a lot to me as a child when she introduced me to people as "my daughter, Melinda". She didn't make the distinction of step-child. But she also didn't cross the line and try to become our mother. She didn't discipline us. For my upcoming wedding, she and my mother are working as a team. Patsy helped Mom select the invitations and organize my engagement party. I know I am fortunate to have a family like this

On day as we were driving in the car, Dad asked, "What would you think about having another brother or sister?" It really caught me off-guard and I was shocked; I guess I just never thought about it. But I was really happy and when Burke and JonBenét were born, it was so exciting! They were both so much fun to be around. Burke liked to play with John Andrew, always looking for him to play matchbook cars, etc. JonBenét and I liked to paint together or play dress up. Each year we colored Easter eggs and we had a Christmas tradition of baking cookies together.

Since I grew up in Georgia, I wasn't used to snow. One day in Boulder, there were little patches of snow on the ground and JonBenet went out to "build a snowman". I soon realized it would be almost impossible to do this with the little bit of snow that was left. But JonBenet was determined. "I know we can do it!" And so, of course, we worked and worked until we had a two-foot-high snowman. I'd do anything to make her happy.

One of my strongest memories is how she always ran to greet me. Her pig tails were flying, her hands were outstretched and she screamed, "Be-winda, Be-winda." It is this memory that I cherish the most.

It breaks my heart to see these horrible accusations being made about Dad and Patsy. They are wonderful parents! Patsy helped raise Beth and John Andrew and me. I watched them with Burke and JonBenet. I know! And yet people who don't know them who have never even met them, are saying absolutely horrible things! They have no right to!!

I'm their daughter. I've lived under the same roof as them. I've had the same parents as JonBenet. I have such a hard time understanding why the public refuses to believe me -- why my word just isn't enough.

I'm glad Dad and Patsy are strong people. They have withstood a lot and they can withstand this too. But it isn't fair. It just isn't fair.

(Melinda was crying as the interview ended)

John Andrew

I was very young when Dad met Patsy and I don't remember much about the first years. I know I was comfortable in both homes and, although I knew Patsy wasn't my mom, she had that role when I was with her and my dad. She encouraged us in our activities but never pushed us into anything. She was interested in all that I did , whether it was Boy Scouts, sports or school activities. I have good memories of growing up. It's not just the vacations and special times, but it's the general everyday things that made a loving and caring family relationship.



I am 10 years older than Burke, but we can still enjoy Play Station together! I was 14 years older than JonBenet and I loved her very much.... we made lemonade together. I know it is accurate to call them "half" brother and sister, but none of us has ever felt we have half a relationship. Burke and JonBenet are my brother and sister. They've never called me "half" brother, they call be "big" brother.


And I resent having to even talk about Dad and Patsy like this I don't see a need to defend our family. Why do we keep having to say we are a normal family? The outlandish, false things that are said are just what the media has made up about us. There is nothing previously in our lives to indicate that we are anything but a loving family yet we have to keep defending ourselves. Dad and Patsy are great parents. What else can I say?
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#4
JonBenét's mother blasts the tabloids

Associated Press

PARKERSBURG, W.Va.— Patsy Ramsey says she is tired of ignoring tabloid reports that imply she and her husband are responsible for the death of their daughter, JonBenét.

"You can only turn the cheek so long," Mrs. Ramsey told The Parkersburg Sentinel in an interview published Monday. "It's not fair."

Mrs. Ramsey, a Parkersburg native, said she and husband John have "given the green light" to friends and family who want to speak out on their behalf.

"The few times we gave statements, they were shredded to pieces. People read into our body language," Mrs. Ramsey said from her home in Atlanta. "We want people to know the type of parents we are."

Until now, the Ramseys have asked friends and family to remain silent about the case and to refuse offers from tabloids and talk shows, Mrs. Ramsey said.

There have been no arrests since JonBenét, 6, was found beaten and strangled in the basement of her family's Boulder home on Dec. 26, 1996. Her parents have maintained their innocence, though police say they have not ruled them out as possible suspects.

Thursday's interview was arranged by longtime friend Linda McLean of North Hills, whose book, "JonBenét's Mother: The Tragedy and the Truth!" was released Aug. 21.

McLean said she wrote the book to support the Ramseys and to dispel tabloid rumors. The book contains signed letters of support by 20 friends and relatives.

"I'm so lucky to have such wonderful friends who thought enough (of me) to speak out," Mrs. Ramsey said.

The Ramseys have shunned reading newspapers or magazines to avoid stories about their daughter's death, she said.

Profits from the book will be donated to the JonBenét Ramsey Children's Foundation, which will benefit children and adults who exhibit good parenting skills, Mrs. Ramsey said.

September 1, 1998
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#5
This book was written by Linda McLean, a teacher who knew Patsy well. She wrote it to share the truth she knew when she saw a friend being maligned everywhere she turned.

There are a lot of photos in it that I can't bring here but the spirit of the book will be here with some good quotes from people who knew Patsy and her family.

OK, so we know in the beginning, the Ramseys asked their friends not to give interviews, be public. This was largely in response to the public reaction to their early CNN interview that thw BORG police, media and Internet posters twisted to hold against both John and Patsy.

There came a time when Linda McLean and a couple others decided enough was enough. John's friend, Jim Marino, went public and defended his feiend and Linda McLean went to Patsy and FINALLY got permission to write a book. Patsy's friends were eager to contribite and this is the result.

This is the last paragraph of the introduction:

We are a variety of people of different ages from different parts of the country who are coming together with one common bond: WE BELIEVE IN PATSY AND JOHN RAMSEY WITH ALL OUR HEARTS. We have faith in human reason. We have faith in normal people.We believe that when you ger to know Patsy and John you will realize how wonderful they are. You will know in your heart that this father did not kill his little girl. You will know in your soul that this mother did not kill her baby.

Linda discusses Patsy's high school years and describes Patsy as a hard worker, a good student who was a joiner, liked competition but was also willing to help others achieve their dreams. Her family was supportive of all three girls, and that included pageant involvement. She was liked by her classmates, one of 4 students chosen by the class to speak at graduation.

And that leads to the first supportive statements from a classmate, Diane Dunn McClure.

A long quote is in the book, I hit the highlights earlier. They became good friends when Diane moved into Patsy's neighborhood. That was the 7th grade and their friendship went on until Patsy passed. Diane said, "... her children were her life."

The last paragraph of her interview:
I think in my heart that people would probably not be questioning Patsy and John if it were not for Susan Smith'a murder of her two sons. That story destroyed out trust in her as a mother and we were betrayed by her plea of innocence. But I am here to shout that Patsy is not that mother! She is not capable of anything like this. She is a good, warm, kind person - the very best! We all love her. And P, we always have been and always will be here for you!
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#6
Lanie Lopez, age 15, babysat for Burke and JonBenet. When she was included in the book, she felt she wanted her contribution to be in the form of a letter to Patsy. I will not type out the whole thing but will hit some highlights of her support.

"... from the very moment I found out about what had happened to JonBenet, the thought never even crossed my mind that you or John had anything to do with this awful tragedy. I know that you are the best mother (next to my own) that any child in this world could be blessed with."

" I personally think that anyone that ever even thought you guys had something to do with JonBenet's death are crazy."

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


OK, I have just been quoting the book up to now but this next bit needs some explaining and I have to tell you it has me in tears for the first time since I started this project.

Setting the stage. The story is being told by Pam Paugh - she is talking about the time of Beth's death. Seems the Ramsey group planned a trip to ski over the holidays -- Melinda and JAR would join John, Patsy, Burke, JonBenet and Patsy's family as well. Word got to Patsy that Cindy, Lucinda, John's first wife and the mother of Melinda and JAR, would he home alone for the holiday. Patsy wouldn't have it, insisted Cindy join them all in Colorado for Christmas.

Pam:

"I remember seeing the two of them standing in the dining room gazing out the window at the freshly fallen snow. Cindy was crying and Patsy was offering comfort. I heard her say to Cindy, "We will get through this together." And my eyes filled to see such compassion."

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Linda wrote about losing her husband, Jim, to cancer when he was just 45 years old. The loss was devastating. And as she had supported Patsy when Patsy was fighting HER cancer, Patsy did all she could to help Linda and Jim through their hard times. The details are touching. Patsy was a good friend.

Which leads to the next quote collected by Linda - this one from a woman who met Patsy when they were both undergoing treatment in fights for their lives. They were roommates and her name is Barbara Sanders.

"She was a favorite of everyone. Whenever she saw you her first question and concern was "How are you doing?" She put everyone at ease; no one was a stranger."

"Her love of people and life shines out of her. Patsy is what I consider to be a good person and a good friend."

"The thought that anyone could ever think that Patsy would ever harm anyone, or let anyone who had harmed someone she loved go unpunished is ludicrous."

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Cousin Debbie shared more memories that I will not not here, suffice it to say they are common memories found in large and loving families. But there are a few lines I will post.

"John Ramsey was a gentle father. Patsy was a patient mother. I never saw either of them yell or raise a hand to their children. Both parents hugged their children and weren't afraid to show or express affection with names like "sweetie". When the kids did something wrong, Patsy would sit down and talk about it. She would say quietly but firmly, "We don't do that." And then she would explain why not."

I don't remember either child having a temper tantrum. They weren't perfect, of course. Burke was aggravated when JonBenet would get in front of the television and she would pester him like siblings do, but he never really got mad and you could tell he really cared for her.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Well, getting close to the end of the book, there are a LOT of photos in there. So sweet. I am so glad Linda went through the effort to do this.

Next is Susan Stine, she met Patsy in Boulder when their sons were in kindergarten. They were friends before the murder, much closer friends after.

Susan admired Patsy not only for her organizational skills but her energy and willingness to put herself out for others. Shendescribed a time when Patsy had people in her home to make decorations for a school event. People were cutting and glueing and glittering and Burke was in charge of making the lemonade And serving cookies.

"Of course, the floor was a sticky mess - but Patsy didn't seem to care a bit. John was there, too, and seemed happy to open his house to this noisey , messy group. He obviously enjoyed this beehive of activity as he talked and laughed with the children.This was a home full of love and laughter, welcoming everyone who entered Iit. No one was a stranger to Patsy and John. "

"I never thought of her as vain." " Speaking of lack of vanity, I remember seeing her at school and home without any hair and I was Iinspired by her energy and enthusiasm. Chemotherapy treatments had rendered her bald, and she had wigs that she sometimes wore. But she said they were hot and uncomfortable, and that she didn't care what she looked like. She knew the children would accept her for what she was like on the inside, not what she looked like on the outside."

Susan wrote about Patsy's strength when fighting cancer, putting on a brave face as she knew she could die without seeing the children grow up. On one particular day, Susan watched her son playing with Burke and JonBenet and said a little prayernasking God to keep her son safe and let herbe with him for a long time. She wrote that she wishes now she said the same prayer for Patsy.

" I have known Patsy before, during and after her horrible loss. I have seen her in situations from profound happiness to the depths of grief and I know what a wonderful human being she is. I have watched John and Patsy endure the worst kind of cruelty imaginable, and yet their faith in God and in each other never waivers and their love for their family pulls them through. They have persevered with a dignity and courage that is seldom seen in this world. I am proud to be their friend; I will always be their friend."

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Linda Mason met Patsy in Charlevoix and spent time visiting the family in Boulder for extended times. She describes a family that is normal, all-American, loving. But she makes a point to say Patsy always did just a bit more than someone might. Instead of going to school to pick up the kids and waiting in line, Patsy got out of the car to meet the kids, hugging and asking how their day was. She speaks about how both kids were involved in multiple activities and excitement and support was there for both kids.
On the pageants:
"Once I walked into their living room and saw JonBenet in Patsy's lap. They were talking about a contest JonBenet had been in and I asked her, "How did ypu do?" She didn't answer me but looked shyly at her mom. Finally, when Patsy encouraged her to answer, she said simply, "I won," and then hopped down and went outside to play. I had no idea until later that it was the Little Miss Colorado Pageant. Other than that one instance, in all the time I've known them and have been in their home, I have never heard any mention of pageants or competition. It just wasn't a focal point of JonBenet's life and I hate that it has become a focal point of her death."

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

There was another woman who wanted to tell her story, wanted to be included in the book, and her name is Vicki Chabol. She was fighting cancer at the same time as Patsy. She knew about this book, spoke to Linda on the phone and said she wanted to be included, to be a voice of support. "I want to help. I want to talk about how good Patsy is." She passed over before a full interview could be arranged but I honor here her "voice".

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

On that thread, which I have copied here because forums outside my control tend to disappear and recently they deleted three months of posts for whatever reason, there was a question I will copy as well, with my answer.

Anonymous
Beckley, WV

Few are claiming that Patsy or John did not love their children. Most are claiming that they loved them so much--and they loved their "perfect" family--that they would cover for one disturbed child who killed their other beloved child. Out of guilt of having failed to seek "help" for the one and for not managing to protect the other. And to preserve their façade of perfection.

So, their friends' estimation of the Ramseys' love for their children fits right into this particular theory. Do you not agree?


Response by jameson245

Actually, NO. I think that IF Burke had been showing any aggression toward his sister, they would have gotten him help for it just as they got the kids help to deal with Patsy's cancer. If he never showed any signs of aggression towards his sister, if they then found him with his sister unconscious -- they wouldn't have thought first of "protecting" him == they would have thought first of SAVING HER! I don't think for a minute they would have put his "protection" (and I have to ask from what?) before her LIFE.

Don't forget -- if, as the BDI theory goes, she was hit in the head 45 minutes before the garrote was used (which makes NO sense with the physical evidence) she was clearly alive when they decided they needed to kill her. She would have been warm to the touch, breathing, even if unconscious.
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