Look at the flashlight on the kitchen counter
#1
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This is a crime scene photo - this is the image shown to John during his interrogation and he said he had a flashlight LIKE that but didn't think this was his as his was like new, this photo showed one John thought looked oldeer, more used.

Remember, this flashlight was taken into evidence and there were no prints found on the batteries.  I know some other people have posted that they have put batteries in their flashlights and not touched the batteries - but I can honestly say I am sure every time I put new batteries in a flashlight, I handled the batteries, made sure I had the positive and negative points right before putting them in the flashlight.  My prints are there.

But I also know career criminals are more careful about leaving prints and I would expect a burglar would not have left his prints on batteries in HIS flashlight.

Anyway, This is the flashlight the police took in as evidence - - and while BORG believed it HAD to be the Ramsey flashlight, those of us with doubts had little to prove it was NOT.

Well, I have something to reopen the discussion - - a photo of interest.

Keep reading.
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#2
   

OK, bear with me here as I tell a story.

The murder has taken place and police have taken in the flashlight found on the counter.  I have found no record of any other flashlights taken into evidence.

Time passes and the Ramseys do not return to the house.  Weeks or even a few months after the murder, professional movers pack up the house and the boxes are put into a storage area. 

In July, investigators working for the Ramsey lawyers go to the storage area and go through some of the boxes (my guess is they were looking for the Santa Bear on this trip but I honestly am not sure.)

Boxes are opened and photos taken.  The photos had to be reviewed at some point by someone but I don't recall anyone discussing those photos at all.

I have been able to review the photos and this one immediately struck me as being possibly important.

This flashlight is in a box in a storage area in Colorado.  The box, and flashlight, ended up being sent to Atlanta.  The police did not take this flashlight and certainly the general public was unaware of ANY such flashlight being taken from the Ramsey house as this one was.

If this is the flashlight John owned, did the killer carry in the one found on the counter?
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#3
My three-cell Mag-Lite has a serial number on it.  Did anyone ever bother to check out when it was made or where it was likely sold?
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#4
It has been 20 years and I don't know where the flashlight in the box ended up. After all, John has moved a half-dozen times since then; I doubt he could say with certainty where that one is.

As for the flashlight on the counter, police had that, knew there were no fingerprints on the batteries. But I never heard anything about them trying to trace it back to a store. I honestly don't think it could be done. I mean, are you supposed to register a flashlight? Does anyone really keep track of such things?
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#5
(08-01-2017, 04:07 PM)jameson245 Wrote: It has been 20 years and I don't know where the flashlight in the box ended up.  After all, John has moved a half-dozen times since then; I doubt he could say with certainty where that one is.

As for the flashlight on the counter, police had that, knew there were no fingerprints on the batteries.  But I never heard anything about them trying to trace it back to a store.  I honestly don't think it could be done.  I mean, are you supposed to register a flashlight?  Does anyone really keep track of such things?

I have this exact same light. I recently replaced the batterie in it and realized I did so without leaving prints. Not deliberately but by holding the middle which is very textured and both the top and bottom has ridges that aren't ideal for prints. I had a four batter   blister pack and slid them in with out touching them. That's when it hit me how it could be done. If you add it being winter and someone could be wearing gloves, voila, no print. Just a possibility.
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#6
It's crazy LE didn't take this into evidence and try to obtain prints. With the house being as big as it is, you would think they would have taken weeks.. Maybe even longer to search through everything. I don't want to even think what was missed.

I do think the killer wore gloves.. As "professional " he seemed to be.. He still made mistakes.. Obviously their investigators were curious about this flashlight.. He could have left some evidence... Who knows!
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#7
(08-01-2017, 04:07 PM)jameson245 Wrote: honestly don't think it could be done.  I mean, are you supposed to register a flashlight?  Does anyone really keep track of such things?

Many manufacturers, especially the better ones, keep all kinds of records about when serial numbers were used and deployed, for their own purposes --- for recalls, quality assurance, and so on.  They don't need you to register the serial number for it to be quite useful to them.  For example, a company can receive returned and refunded items to check their records against when they made production or engineering changes, changed suppliers, and such things.  They can also often tell which stores or which geographical area received which ranges of serial numbers, etc.  It may be, for example, that this particular flashlight was never sold to the public but was provided to some law enforcement agency. 

If this was never checked, it's a serious oversight, given the so-so or fair chance that it was used as the weapon to cause blunt force trauma.

Update (11 August 2017): Jams just posted an excerpt from ST's book where he and his ghost partner wrote, regarding the flashlight: "But we were unable to trace the serial number."
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#8
I have seen NO evidence of any such investigation done on the flashlight and have no reason to think one was.

I am hoping one day to find they actually got a list of all the people who bought Air Tasers - - I know those had to be registered.
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#9
(08-02-2017, 04:55 PM)jameson245 Wrote: I have seen NO evidence of any such investigation done on the flashlight and have no reason to think one was.

I'm not surprised.  In this case, the proverbial ball has been dropped so many times that it has spent most of its time on the ground rather than in play.
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#10
Fact - there was an unidentified "waxy type substance" on the flashlight. Any thoughts on that?
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